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Old 16th December 2010, 09:17 PM   #11
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'Seems from your description to be a frequency response or distortion matter.
Have you simmed the THD100 hz. THD10 kHz distortion? Can you post the plots
with your frequency response plot so that we can see what is actually going on?

BTW, this is your own design but what is the schematic so that comparison can
be made to similar types. The speaker types and other load issues are important
in these elemental designs. Of course, you can't see this by simming a simple
resistive load.
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Old 16th December 2010, 09:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcollege View Post
I have been unorthodox in using a switching power supply that switches at a rate well into the GHZ.

Could the switching power supply cause the fatigue?...(the sound of tv's and computer monitors used to drive me crazy)
You don't say how old you are or what your noise experience is. I was bothered as a child by the horrible howl of the televisions at the department store, but lost all sensitivity to frequencies above 15000 hz at summer camp in 1969. Guns, unmuffled motor vehicles, near lightning strikes, playing an instrument in front of speakers, can destroy hi frequency sensitivity permanently.
You should take a scope and look at your amp output. My mixer was producing 1 Mhz 1.5 V oscillation out as I was "improving" it, and I really couldn't hear the effect in the short term, but it sure was making the fan on the power amp run like crazy. Who knows what it was doing to distortion, I wasn't running a test quality record, just the FM radio.
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Old 18th December 2010, 09:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indianajo View Post
You don't say how old you are or what your noise experience is. I was bothered as a child by the horrible howl of the televisions at the department store, but lost all sensitivity to frequencies above 15000 hz at summer camp in 1969. Guns, unmuffled motor vehicles, near lightning strikes, playing an instrument in front of speakers, can destroy hi frequency sensitivity permanently.
You should take a scope and look at your amp output. My mixer was producing 1 Mhz 1.5 V oscillation out as I was "improving" it, and I really couldn't hear the effect in the short term, but it sure was making the fan on the power amp run like crazy. Who knows what it was doing to distortion, I wasn't running a test quality record, just the FM radio.

Erhm, most poeple above 40 cannot hear 15 kHz anyway.

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Old 18th December 2010, 10:13 AM   #14
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I'd try a linear power supply.

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