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Old 7th May 2008, 04:38 PM   #1
gareth is offline gareth  Wales
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Default Class S amplification

Hi,

Could anyone explain what the theory is behind Class S amplification?
and if it is worth the time and effort in trying to design this type of amplification?
Any opinions

Gareth
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:06 PM   #2
jony is offline jony  Poland
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I think that class S became today class D amplifier.
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:20 PM   #3
Symon is offline Symon  United Kingdom
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actually Class S is more like quad current dumping,
in that it has a small class A amplifier and a powerful class B amplifier linked together.
However at this point the similarity ends, the principals of operation are different. But without looking it up I can't reliably give any more detail.
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:25 PM   #4
gareth is offline gareth  Wales
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That sounds pretty good to me Class A input married to Class B output. Do you know if they are a good design? I am asking because you don't seem to see these around anymore.
Also, are Class S difficult designs to realise?

Gareth
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:36 PM   #5
Symon is offline Symon  United Kingdom
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I don't know about now but in the mid 1990's Technics were using a Class S like topology in there range of amplifiers. eg SE-A100.

perhaps they still do?
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:43 PM   #6
gareth is offline gareth  Wales
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Do you know if there are any reasons why this topology is not used anymore?

Gareth
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Old 7th May 2008, 05:47 PM   #7
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
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Hi,

As far as I know the Sandman topology is not called class S.

/sreten.
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Old 7th May 2008, 08:46 PM   #8
Symon is offline Symon  United Kingdom
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I've certainly seen it used to mean Sandman topology, but I wouldn't rule out it being used to define some other topology.
I suspect over the years Class S has been used for Sandman and Switching (now known as Class D).
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Old 7th May 2008, 09:41 PM   #9
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I don't have a link but back when I was doing research (couple years ago) into different classes Class S was originally defined as what we call Class D today. Class D also was defined but the difference was the LC network on the output. The classes A - H and S were mostly defined nearly 100 years ago. There is a Class E & F but are not very well know (used in communications similar to how Class C is used in radio transmission). In the last 10 years we have seen Class T, I and now XD which are not real classes at all. Class T and I are Class D (Class I being Class BD) and XD being a version of Class AB (or B depending on who you ask). The class of an amplifier is a general description with some having subclasses such as Class D having AD and BD (how the output waveform works) and then tube amplifiers having subclasses based on biasing. Sometimes people get too caught up in trying use a class definition too specifically. But I do hate marketing classes such as T, I and XD.

-SL
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Old 7th May 2008, 09:48 PM   #10
gareth is offline gareth  Wales
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Quote:
Originally posted by SpittinLLama
I don't have a link but back when I was doing research (couple years ago) into different classes Class S was originally defined as what we call Class D today. Class D also was defined but the difference was the LC network on the output. The classes A - H and S were mostly defined nearly 100 years ago. There is a Class E & F but are not very well know (used in communications similar to how Class C is used in radio transmission). In the last 10 years we have seen Class T, I and now XD which are not real classes at all. Class T and I are Class D (Class I being Class BD) and XD being a version of Class AB (or B depending on who you ask). The class of an amplifier is a general description with some having subclasses such as Class D having AD and BD (how the output waveform works) and then tube amplifiers having subclasses based on biasing. Sometimes people get too caught up in trying use a class definition too specifically. But I do hate marketing classes such as T, I and XD.

-SL

Thanks LLama,
I thought that Class D used PWM and Class S was a Class A input feeding a Class B output....do you know if this topology is a good design if implemented properly?

Gareth
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