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Old 16th February 2008, 02:04 AM   #1
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Default So whats the real deal with behringer ep-2500

Hello, I am trying to find the scoop on the behringer ep-2500 amp. I have done alot of looking and I have seen that it does not do its rated power, that it does do its rated power, that its a budget amp with poor build quality, that its built better than crown amps (great quality), people say they are a great deal, people saying to stay away. Even on diyaudio there are alot of things said aout this amp, then people say things at the other end of the spectrum. The reason I ask is because I have the ability to buy one for 180 dollars in town. He sais he has had it for about two years, has used it about five times (weddings) and it still looks brand new. I plan using it to power a pair of rss315ho drivers in ported boxes. So at 4 ohms 650 watts per driver.

Thank you for any light shed.

Dan
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Old 16th February 2008, 08:19 PM   #2
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Hello,

The EP2500 is a close brother to the the QSC RMX2450, and teh EP1500 is close to the RMX1450. The build quality is as good as the QSC's. I have schematics for the EP amps if anyone wants them. Schematics are available for the QSC amps as well for those who'd like to compare.

Their were high power tests done on it at the AVS forum. Try a search there.

The Mackie M series and the Tapco J series (Mackie made) also seem to be close copies of the QSC RMX series. The Tapcos are also well made. I haven't been up close with a Mackie M series amps so i can't comment there, but i assume they are also well made.

I'm hoping Behringer drops the A500 and makes an "EP800" so they have a complete range of good power amps.
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Old 18th February 2008, 07:42 AM   #3
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Click the image to open in full size.

Tapco transformer is much bigger, and it has two fans.

"assuming that's top to bottom, Tapco, QSC, Behringer?? "

Yes: T, Q, B.

"but sometimes its the bits you can't see that count, like clip limiters and protection. "

Yes, but the schematic for the Tapco is IDENTICAL to the QSC. So is the basic Behringer, but it has different protection circuits.

The caps look bigger on the Tapco but they are the same F, just 80V vs the QSC being 63V. A bit of safety margin for high line voltage conditions, plus the bigger can size allows it to run cooler for the same ripple current (for longer life).

"so would the tapco 2500 run two 8 0hm 18" bass bins (4 0hm) in bridge mode and be a happy little amp or would it get stressed an blow itself up? "

I never run amps below 4R in stereo, or 8R in mono. None of those designs have enough outputs or heatsink.

If you want to do that then buy the Behringer, throw away the transformer, and buy a new one at a lower voltage and higher current. What you now have will be like the QSC RMX1850HD.
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Old 18th February 2008, 01:03 PM   #4
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Next time i have my camera at my friends house i'll pop open his EP2500. From what i remember the transformer is not that small. I think in the first round of EP2500's they used a smaller transformer, but now you get one as big as the Tapco's.

However it does look like the Tapco is worth the extra 50$.
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Old 18th February 2008, 03:54 PM   #5
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Hi,

Here's a pic of my EP1500, transformer clearly larger than in djk's pic of an EP2500. So there seems like there is no rule (at least not without exceptions) about transformer size among manufactures of these amps.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ep1500.jpg (43.7 KB, 898 views)
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Old 18th February 2008, 08:45 PM   #6
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I correct myself ;-)
Quote:
So there seems like there is no rule (at least not without exceptions) about transformer size among manufactures of these amps.
Well at least Behringer seems to save on transformers sometimes, I don't know about the others.

Tests done with EP1500 and EP2500 at AVS forum that Strormrider hinted at seem to prove that in particular EP2500 has some troubles to reach it's advertised specifications. Nevertheless both these amps do provide some serious power for little money.
Link:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=855865
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Old 18th February 2008, 11:07 PM   #7
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50hz transformers have to be bigger than the 60hz ones sold in the USA.
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Old 19th February 2008, 04:18 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by djk
50hz transformers have to be bigger than the 60hz ones sold in the USA.
That's possible, but it's not uncommon that they use the same transformer, just rearranging the primaries.
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Old 19th February 2008, 05:39 AM   #9
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There is a substantial savings to be had in using a 60hz 120V primary for the USA market only vs a universal 115/230 50/60hz transformer (when you're selling thousands of units).
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Old 19th February 2008, 09:03 AM   #10
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You are of course right, your market is so big that it becomes beneficial.
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