Mark Levinson ML-2 Problems - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Solid State

Solid State Talk all about solid state amplification.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 30th January 2008, 07:02 PM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Quote:
Please, be kind to your ML-2s. Let them breathe.
Sounds real good! You should get a pair to take care for
I will do that but there's one problem the old ones (the kind I have) don't have the vents like the ones with the toroid and my Class AB2 ML-3. They initialy reasoned probably that while the outputtransistors are on external heatsinks ventilation inside the main unit was not really necessary. It keeps the inside pretty clean though, but parts inside become very warm indeed as I measured with a temperature rod. Got to find the originally hardware manufacturer that can supply me with a top- and bottomplate with vented slots in them.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ml3-ml2s-vents-or-no-vents.jpg (99.1 KB, 900 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 08:40 PM   #12
ekaerin is offline ekaerin  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
ekaerin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Stockholm
Brian,

By looking at your picture, an idea came up. Maybe it is possible to put a washer on each screw holding the top cover. If the washer is placed between the cover and the frame it will create an air-slot to let air out.
(You could even cut something like a thin gasket out from some filter
material and put there to keep dust out).

Just a crazy idea but may work.

BR / Mattias
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 08:59 PM   #13
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Quote:
If the washer is placed between the cover and the frame it will create an air-slot to let air out.
Sounds not bad at all . Should do the same for the bottomplate because there's a need for letting cool fresh air in before you can let it out. Thanks Mattias
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 09:00 PM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Columbia, SC
Your wood floors are a factor in your favor. I've seen a lot of people who drop amps on carpet and think they're doing their amps a favor by having them out in the open. Well, the out in the open thing is good, but carpet--especially deep carpet--will keep your heatsinks from getting good airflow. The weight of the amp pushes the feet down into the pile and the rest of the carpet is right under the bottom edge of your heatsinks.
If you've got your amps on carpet, consider putting a piece of wood underneath. It can be nice wood. I know a guy who uses a piece of white Formica counter top. If you want to go low budget, use plywood or particle board...or a piece of MDF left over after your last speaker project. You score cool points if you go get a slab of something neat like granite or marble, but that's likely to set you back a penny or two.
I favor rack mounting, myself, but a lot of people don't like the way it looks, so that may or may not work for everyone. It sure does tidy up a multi-amp setup, though. Just keep any equipment that runs hot separated; they make dummy panels to cover up the holes between things. Or you can make your own using Lexan or something of that nature. Smoked gray looks good in some installations and lets a little light through for when you're behind the rack trying to fiddle with connections.

Grey
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 09:04 PM   #15
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Columbia, SC
If you have a problem with washers rattling or don't like the silver against black, consider everyday black Neoprene O-rings. They'll damp any rattling, keep your paint or anodizing from getting scratched, and be nearly invisible against a black chassis. And they're cheap--about the same cost as a metal washer.

Grey
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 09:14 PM   #16
ekaerin is offline ekaerin  Sweden
diyAudio Member
 
ekaerin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Stockholm
If using O-rings of rubber just make sure the top / bottom cover are not part
of the structural framework that make up the rigidity of the mechanical design.

Metal washers are available as black or just paint them.
Don't know the word in English but the type that is not coplanar wont rattle.

/ Mattias
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 09:26 PM   #17
Aengus is offline Aengus  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Aengus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Victoria, BC
Quote:
Don't know the word in English but the type that is not coplanar wont rattle.
Lock washers.
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th January 2008, 09:45 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Quote:
consider everyday black Neoprene O-rings
Quote:
If using O-rings of rubber just make sure the top / bottom cover are not part
The topplate is no problem, it's a sheet of brushed anodized aluminum. The chassis of the ML-3 is made out of steel and the bottom is part of the U-shaped steel chassis. The ML-2's I'm not sure about. The bottomplate is an individual item but I'm not sure if it's a integral part of the chassis.
Have to investigate there.

Good night and thanks

I hope that the initial starter of this thread can sort out his problems with his ML-2's. Sometimes you have to be patient to get the right man for the job.

I'll would send them to Nelson Pass being the only one left that designs pure Class A gear. Would be a nice experiment, made be Levinson upgraded by Pass.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th February 2008, 09:40 PM   #19
huy801 is offline huy801  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Default ML-2 Quote

Well I have an update on my dead amplifier. I dropped it off with a local repair shop and they said they need to replace all the transistors and re-bias the system. The repair shop says it will cost about 1400 to fix, they will match all the transistors and reset the bias. Is this a reasonable price?

Thanks,
Huy
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th February 2008, 01:08 AM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Columbia, SC
All the transistors? Hmmm... Granted, I haven't seen the amp and don't have any idea what kind of shape it's in, but that sounds pretty extreme. If all the transistors are gone, then I'd expect that at least some of the passive parts--resistors, primarily--would be toast also.
I have no comment on the price; I'll leave that to others. I'm just curious as to how all the transistors (presumably including those in the power supply) managed to get clobbered.
Please keep in mind that some of those parts are obsolete. It's a little optimistic to think that a full set can be found at this late date.

Grey
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mark Levinson №27.5 Taifun Solid State 101 14th March 2011 09:57 PM
Mark Levinson no:29 Snorkeltjes Solid State 19 24th November 2007 12:18 PM
Mark Levinson 23 highviewvideo Solid State 6 21st December 2006 05:52 PM
mark levinson karma Swap Meet 8 8th March 2003 01:42 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:56 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2