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Old 11th November 2005, 08:55 PM   #1
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Default Question about ac currents outside of US

Ok , just a simple basic question for the majority of people here but for me I'm lost it seems.
Ok I know here in the US we run 110 v ac overseas its 220 vac here we also have 220 vac but its two legs of the plug ghetting 110 vac each to = the 220vac , now the question is what reading on a meter will I be getting if I check the 3 prong female side of a overseas 220 vac setup ?

2 blade plugs and a round plug . Here I get 110 vac on one leg of the plug .
I have a overseas upc to play with which is 220 vac in and 220 vac output with 2 12 vdc batteries powering it .Bateries fully charged so out put should be correct for the unit , with a meter I'm getting 69 vac on 1 leg and 152 vac on the second leg . to = aprox 220 vac slight varriance at different times of checking it . Anyway what should I be getting or are these readings correct .I'd like to be able to convert it to run on 110 vac . Just a quick look at the insides showed a large transformer from the line in has 2 wires only one to the power in and one to the board which the board has 110 v printed on it where that wire attaches .I'm assuming , I know that can be a bad thing to do lots of times but anyway Should I be able to remove the transformer and run the hot side of us 110 v to that lug on the board and be ok on the input side of the supply ? Second question is if that is correct what will I need to do on the output side to drop in down to 110v that would be useable with us electronics ? I would have thought I could use the transformer from the input to step down the 220 to 110 but with the voltages being read on the output as it is 69v first prong and 150v on the second prong my thought of the step down by using the transformer doesnt work in my mind . I know nothing , I repeat NOTHING about overseas currents and cant find an answer online either but always thought it would be like us current only 220v instead of 110v on the 1 leg and the round post on the plug an earth ground . but it looks like I'm way off on my thought .If it was just the 220v on the 1 leg I assume again I could just reverse the transformer and step the power back to the 110v Any help or ideals from the people in the know ? Have I confused anyone or everyone enough yet ?
Its terrible to remember just enough about electronics to not get killed .
Thanks for any suggestions , except for the one to find a new hobby .
With luck perhaps my memory will come back someday .

Thanks:
Tim
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Old 11th November 2005, 09:06 PM   #2
sss is offline sss  Israel
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here in israel we got 220V ac as regular + a 3 phase connector
that puts out 400V between every 2 phases
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Old 11th November 2005, 09:24 PM   #3
mzzj is offline mzzj  Finland
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First, it would be great aid for readability if you divide your text to couple of smaller paragraphs. That is something awfully difficult to read.

And yes, it is should be possible to use 220-110 stepdown transformer with your ups. Just wire 220v winding of transformer to prongs as you get 220v between them.150+69=219v

In us you have normally 110-0 and for high power equipment 110-0-110 with "hot" wires in opposite phase, giving 220v if you measure between "hot" prongs.

Most popular choice over here is 220-0, plus some exeptions like norvegians who use floating power grid.

And dont became darwin-awards winner, stay alive
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Old 12th November 2005, 01:23 AM   #4
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mzzj ,
sorry 'bout the poor writing skills .Yes I am guilty of forgeting to atleast try and use proper writing skills when on the internet .I'll try to work on that.

Ok , so are you saying that I would pull the 2 wires 150v and 69v together and run them to the 220 v side of the transformer and then run the 110 v out from transformer to the hot side of the 3 prong plug ?

Ok , if I pull the 2 wires together to = the 220v as a single wire going to the 220v in side of the transformer with 110v out ,what do I then wire to the other leg of the plug ? The round ground would stay the same I assume but the third prong will be wired to what ?

I'm tryin' to stay alive , that's why I thought I'd ask first . I havent pulled the cover off the power out side of the ups yet so not sure how it's wired to begin with .

BTW this is a brand new overseas ups that was sent to us here in the USA out of error and when contacting the Co. they said to just dispose of the incorrect units as we wished and sent us new ones that were correct to replace them .So thought I'd tinker with them .

Thanks
Tim
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Old 12th November 2005, 08:48 PM   #5
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Location: Germany / Bavaria / Augsburg
Here in Germany 220V is history.
Since several years we have 230V / 50Hz.

Any equipment is expected to work with this nominal Voltage +/- 15%.

AFAIK in USA they also changed to 115V? But Im not sure.

In the other European countries they basically also have 230V.
Maybe somewhere still is 220V.

On the island (United Kingdom) they sometimes also have 240V or even 250V due to a poor regulation.

3-phase voltage is always the 2-phase voltage times SQR(3).

110V: 190V (speak 190V)
115V: 199V (speak 200V)
220V: 381V (speak 380V)
230V: 398V (speak 400V)
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Old 13th November 2005, 10:02 AM   #6
mzzj is offline mzzj  Finland
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cybergent
Here in Germany 220V is history.
Since several years we have 230V / 50Hz.

Yes, also here 230v for last ten years at least. I just didnt want to cause more confusion to thread starter
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Old 14th November 2005, 02:07 PM   #7
Tweeker is offline Tweeker  United States
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Quote:
AFAIK in USA they also changed to 115V? But Im not sure.
Were not all that sure either, its nominaly 120V now.
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