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Old 25th August 2005, 01:42 PM   #21
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This is the type of supply I use:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Boschert-Switchi...QQcmdZViewItem

It's very difficult to find a used 100+ amp 12 volt supply. It's relatively easy to find the 5 volt versions. I have 2 sets of the 5x3 supplies and they work fine. New supplies that can supply more than 100 amps at 12+ volts are going to cost $1K+. The 5v supplies are relatively inexpensive. Of course, if you can find a single 12 volt supply that can deliver the required current for a reasonable price, that would be the best option.
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Old 25th August 2005, 01:43 PM   #22
JohnnyJ is offline JohnnyJ  Australia
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Instead of me keep asking these questions as they come, can you just tell me what equipment I actually NEED to make this a 'safe' and 'stable' system please? You know this stuff MUCH better than me anyway.

NOTE: I do NOT want to underpower my amplifier, I want to run it at it's full potential. Thanks.
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Old 25th August 2005, 02:04 PM   #23
JohnnyJ is offline JohnnyJ  Australia
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http://www.innovative.co.nz/PDF/DS-Schaefer_Std_DC.pdf

I found that beast but I doubt it's within the $500 range :O!
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Old 25th August 2005, 06:34 PM   #24
Loial is offline Loial  Sweden
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IMHO the best solution for this ( and without doubt the most economic) , is, as you mentioned, a couple standard sealed lead-acid batteries, a quite heavy battery charger, and a voltage regulator, set to perhaps 12V. Many car audio dealers use this. I think the voltage regulator is important, since some battery chargers can achieve 20V's or even higher peaks...
If you are going to use this setup at home, i doubt you will run it at maximum power, longer than a few seconds at a time.
If you use two 60Ah batteries, you can run the amps at full rms power for more than 5-10 minutes.
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Old 25th August 2005, 10:48 PM   #25
JohnnyJ is offline JohnnyJ  Australia
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Quote:
Originally posted by Loial
IMHO the best solution for this ( and without doubt the most economic) , is, as you mentioned, a couple standard sealed lead-acid batteries, a quite heavy battery charger, and a voltage regulator, set to perhaps 12V. Many car audio dealers use this. I think the voltage regulator is important, since some battery chargers can achieve 20V's or even higher peaks...
If you are going to use this setup at home, i doubt you will run it at maximum power, longer than a few seconds at a time.
If you use two 60Ah batteries, you can run the amps at full rms power for more than 5-10 minutes.
What? Why only 5-10 minutes? They are being charged at a constant rate by the battery charger, so why can they only go for 5-10mins (at the max of 3000watts even)? I don't quite understand. Thing is, I want the equipment to be able to handle me playing at full volume and for say 2 hours at a time.. maybe not FULL volume all the time but I'll be playing at quite high volumes for most of the time. Also, wtf is the point in even getting ANY equipment if it can only handle "5-10minutes"... I think that is something the most idiotic person on earth would do. I'm not attacking your post, but man that just don't make any sense to me aye :P

I don't really want to use batteries, they do go F'd up after a while we know that for sure. I'd prefer using a proper power supply, though I ALSO understand that this might not be possible for around the $500 budget. I can spend no more than $500 for the power supply or whatever equipment to power my amplifier.

Thanks again!
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Old 25th August 2005, 10:52 PM   #26
Eva is offline Eva  Spain
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Then don't waste your time with car audio stuff. Second hand PA amplifiers are powerful and cheap.
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Old 25th August 2005, 10:59 PM   #27
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You still don't understand the MOST important part...

Even if you have a 500A supply, you will still need to get at least 15-20A from the wall outlet to power it. Problem is that is neither common nor safe, ALL the power supplies in this size I have seen are multiple-phase units that require a 20A+ breaker and the weird sockets for 110 or 220V usage (go look at the plug on your drying machine to see what I am talking about).

And all you need is a 150A supply, NOT 300.





-Matt
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Old 25th August 2005, 11:27 PM   #28
JZatopa is offline JZatopa  United States
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After reading your first post it occured to me that you are asking this question in the wrong forum, you should be asking this in car audio even though it's for a PS. First of all You don't need anything close to 135A to use this amp. The power supplies used at stores are like the ones select products sells. Unless you have bench tested your amp and know what it puts out I can tell you that the 1500wrms at 20hms is a maximum rating at a large amount of distortion. Installers call the the IFS rating (if lightning strikes). Pioneer does not under rate their amps, they over rate their amps. If you want to look at a company that under rates their amps look at JL. Their 500/1 when tested measured at 800wrms into 2 ohms. They also switched to the new standard of mesuring called CEA-2006 which as far as I know pioneer has not. You are also forgeting that unless you are pushing your amp to max power all the time you will never need that many amps. There have been many people who have used even a computer PS to power their car amps in home.

Personally I think that a PS to use your amp at home is a waste unless you are planning on switching amps often to test their sound on high end home speakers. For the price of a PS you could buy a very nice home sub amp. Hell, for the $400 you will spend on the PS you could buy a nice sub and sub amp. Pioneer subs are not known for their SQ. You could buy an adire audio sub and an amp from apexjr or if you don't want to build an enclosure you could pick up a sonnicraft sub kit with enclosure from madisound. Hell for a bit more you could get a NHT sub kit.
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Old 26th August 2005, 12:17 AM   #29
DC Dave is offline DC Dave  United States
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Johnny
If your budget is $500 why on earth would you be considering such a crazy (moronic?) idea. Scrap the car amp idea and buy a real (mains powered) amplifier. Have you ever seen a car battery blow-up? Its not pretty. If you shop around, for $500 you could get a decent starter system including a plate amp for the sub, a receiver, DVD player, and speakers. If it was me I would sell the Pioneer sub and amp and start over.
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Old 26th August 2005, 04:25 AM   #30
Loial is offline Loial  Sweden
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Quote:
What? Why only 5-10 minutes? They are being charged at a constant rate by the battery charger, so why can they only go for 5-10mins (at the max of 3000watts even)? I don't quite understand. Thing is, I want the equipment to be able to handle me playing at full volume and for say 2 hours at a time.. maybe not FULL volume all the time but I'll be playing at quite high volumes for most of the time. Also, wtf is the point in even getting ANY equipment if it can only handle "5-10minutes"... I think that is something the most idiotic person on earth would do. I'm not attacking your post, but man that just don't make any sense to me aye :P
Well, to begin with - when you say "playing for huors at full volume" - that is music you play then, right? playing ordinary music, even at full volume, doesn't require the full power from the amps, more like 1/10:th of it seen over a longer time perspective.
( If you plan on playing a 20Hz sine for hours, then your power supply is not the thing to die first. )

And, even more powerful chargers aren't able to deliver anything near 560 amps, more like 10-50 amps, the chargers charge the batteries when the amps aren't using a lot of current.
You should be able to play at FULL rms power for, say, 10 minutes, to be on the safe side with battery lifespan etc...

Quote:
maybe not FULL volume all the time but I'll be playing at quite high volumes for most of the time.
Even if you play "quite high", the required power from your amps is not big, because of the logarithmic behaviour of sound.
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