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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
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Old 9th May 2018, 06:09 AM   #21
felipeunix is offline felipeunix  Germany
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Salas, why did you choose Rf + C1 as the input filter?
No significant results with C-L-C instead?
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Old 9th May 2018, 07:07 AM   #22
Salas is offline Salas  Greece
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
No space for such, so I put there a basic RC cell for EMI/RFI. Rf can also be a jumper of course if the Quasimodo snubber is implemented and the diodes are super quiet types. Or to be used as an insertion point for something external.
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Old 9th May 2018, 07:12 AM   #23
Dimdim is offline Dimdim  Greece
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
I was (and still am actually) one of the lucky few that got to beta test Salas' new baby.

This thing is remarkable.

Click the image to open in full size.

When we swapped it in place of the BiB 1.1 in my Soekris, the improvement was immediately obvious and not subtle. There was a general improvement in clarity and silence, but the biggest improvement (imho) is that the music appeared to have more energy in the lower mid area, where before it was kind of "dry". This was with Salas' very first prototype, built with standard (non-boutique) components. The board that I built with audio grade capacitors in the filter bank and MUSE BP caps in the output sounded even better.

I do need to experiment further with different brands of caps (especially in the C2 & C3 positions) but in any case this is an excellent power supply, substantially better than the BiB 1.1, both subjectively (the way it sounds..) as well as objectively (measured performance).

I plan on also testing it in my Buffalo III+ and AK4490 DACs as well as in my preamp. So, more to follow.
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Old 9th May 2018, 07:25 AM   #24
selfy is offline selfy  Bulgaria
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DimDim, let me put my 2 in. I think Panasonic FM's are really great capacitors for audio. The next logical step, however, would be AN KAISEI, which really take the music on another level!

PS: For the power tank capacitor (after the rectifier) my preferences fall on Mundorfs, F&Ts or AN standart series. Unfortunately the AN KAISEI's perform poorly as power tanks after the rectifier.
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Last edited by selfy; 9th May 2018 at 07:52 AM.
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Old 9th May 2018, 08:21 AM   #25
vgeorge is offline vgeorge  Greece
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
Salas also honored me to do also a beta testing on one of my DCG3 preamp.
I have two DCG3 preamps and this is the one I use in my computer (usually as a test bed) with headphones - DT150 and AKG 712 pro - or with speakers - continuums and a PeeCeeBee amp.
Did may test with components and I think Salas has the feedback and will let you know what components you can use in order everything to be stable. Keep in mind that if a capacitor is good for audio, it has to fulfill some criteria in order to be useful in this circuit.
I did enough listening before and after swapping the regulator mainly with headphones.
The change in sound to better was apparent at first listen. As other have described, better clarity and definition throughout the audio range, but for me it was also apparent up high the frequency where I could hear more power but without any harshness.
I am waiting for the final version and thinking changing the dual mono regulators on the DCG3 on my main system.
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Old 9th May 2018, 08:34 AM   #26
samoloko is offline samoloko  Bulgaria
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Congrats Salas,
BIB SSLV 1.1 Is already highly respected regulator
designing a better sounding one with no NOS parts Is marvelous
can you comment about absent 4 output wires and also a word about posibility of oscilations
Green pcb mask Is very good choice

Last edited by samoloko; 9th May 2018 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 9th May 2018, 09:02 AM   #27
merlin el mago is offline merlin el mago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salas View Post
Thanks, it took much work from there to there
Thanks to share your work with us, really appreciated as always.

The reg. works better with analog or with digital or both?
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Old 9th May 2018, 09:05 AM   #28
Dimdim is offline Dimdim  Greece
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
Considering the improvement that it made on the Soekris, which is a hybrid "analog & digital" board, I'd dare say that it works well for both.
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Old 9th May 2018, 11:13 AM   #29
Tea-Bag is offline Tea-Bag  United States
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
Quote:
Originally Posted by selfy View Post
DimDim, let me put my 2 in. I think Panasonic FM's are really great capacitors for audio. The next logical step, however, would be AN KAISEI, which really take the music on another level!
My affinity for Panasonic FM's is they are more forgiving in the temperature side for those of us who like to cook components. 105c for 2000 plus hours minimum. They also meet the C3 specification here, at least in the 100uf model I am using.

On another note.
For many, the BIB had limitations from a calculation perspective and what to use for parts.
Here, no calculator is needed, just order off the BOM for resistors and your done. No playing with calculator, LEDs and resistors to get the Vout correct.
This helps many a beginner move forward with the project with ease.
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Old 9th May 2018, 12:08 PM   #30
Salas is offline Salas  Greece
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Salas SSLV1.3 UltraBiB shunt regulator
Quote:
Originally Posted by samoloko View Post
Congrats Salas,
BIB SSLV 1.1 Is already highly respected regulator
designing a better sounding one with no NOS parts Is marvelous
can you comment about absent 4 output wires and also a word about posibility of oscilations
Green pcb mask Is very good choice
This one needs a specified close range termination node due to its much higher open loop gain and wider response. Else its very easy to upset or to gather field noises. I was expecting that from the theoretical and breadboard phases already but I gave it a go on the very first test board version anyway. There was a 2Wire/4Wire switch, even a small plastic cap and resistor Zobel option. Those options proved very sensitive in test indeed. To the contrary the local termination on the ground plane with proper characteristics electrolytic proved robustly stable. So I deleted the options in the next and final PCB iteration.

It manages to perform better on normal 2W mode than the 1.1 on Kelvin 4W nonetheless. And it does not require a dummy load to set Vout for logical CCS settings at least that won't torture M2 on sink. Simple output wiring, everything is simpler in this. All it needs is little output wire or trace length, few cm, between its output node and the first fast bypass capacitor it will meet on a load's rail. You can see the very first board here with jumpered 2W/4W mode and unused sense output (actually made parallel by the jumpers).

Green and HASL with lead was actually the cheapest protos I could make in quantity of few for test. Looking nice until I reworked it. Cheap always looks nice at first. Sticky desoldering even with a vacuum gun and a pads disaster. No contest to what I was used to with my thick copper double immersion gold padded 1.1. regulars. And such high quality it will be for 1.3 too. Rest of those test boards I gave to the beta guys. In any case a Back In Black regulator owes to be naturally black
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