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Ganged switching power supply for a tube amp.
Ganged switching power supply for a tube amp.
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Old 7th March 2018, 06:02 PM   #1
kodabmx is offline kodabmx  Canada
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Default Ganged switching power supply for a tube amp.

It uses an ATX power supply (or a 12V battery/car) to heat the heaters and drive boost converters for HV, including one that boosts 12V to 13.5V to get 440V from a 380V supply.

I use an EVGA 750W G2 supply: EVGA - Products - EVGA SuperNOVA 750 G2, 80+ GOLD 750W, Fully Modular, EVGA ECO Mode, 10 Year Warranty, Includes FREE Power On Self Tester Power Supply 220-G2-0750-XR - 220-G2-0750-XR

into the following:

This module gives the boost from the LV supply: 1200W 20A DC Converter Boost Car Step-up Power Supply Module 8-60V to 12-83V | eBay

This module gives me 280V for the preamp/buffer/headphone amp: DC-AC Converter 12V to 110V 200V 220V 280V 150W Inverter Boost Board Transformer | eBay

This module gives me the 440V for the power stage after boosting the input to 13.5V: MINI DC-AC Inverter 12V to 18V220V/380V 500W Boost Step UP Power Module New Hot | eBay

This works far better, and for less money than a conventional linear supply.

It powers an integrated amp with 20 tubes.
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Last edited by kodabmx; 7th March 2018 at 07:22 PM. Reason: Took out the added line spacing... Fix that.
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Old 7th March 2018, 07:25 PM   #2
kodabmx is offline kodabmx  Canada
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Here is a photo of the amp it powers. Yes, there's a nixie to show which input, and regulated screen supply per channel.
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Last edited by kodabmx; 7th March 2018 at 07:27 PM.
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Old 7th March 2018, 07:41 PM   #3
jlithen is offline jlithen  Finland
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I admire your solution...even if some of the most linear minded DIYists would have a serious issue with it
Also your amp looks nice!

Would you like to elaborate on how it works better than a linear PSU?

Also thanks for sharing the links.
When I need a boost converter I might also buy one of those
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Old 8th March 2018, 03:45 AM   #4
PRR is offline PRR  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlithen View Post
..how it works better than a linear PSU?...
I'm seeing $55 total cost.(*) Aint no way I could assemble that much high voltage power linearly and have change from a $100 bill.

And I assume it is regulated, or at least not as saggy as a low-buck iron supply.

(*) I count the ATX supply as "free". In a past life I had them stacked to the rafters. ATX supplies fail, but not as often as the rest of the PC, and failed PCs came to me. Even retired, I could find another in the house; or buy one in town 6 days a week. I'd put loose cash in extra $13 modules, because IMHO some of this stuff does not last. I put $6 e-meters on my power line, and one had a minor failure in a year, so I rushed to buy two more exact same type (to minimize change-over pain). No objection to Koda buying a very nice ATX supply, of course.
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Old 8th March 2018, 04:13 PM   #5
jlithen is offline jlithen  Finland
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Totally agree with the cost thing, kodabmx also mentioned that in the first post.

I think the 12V output is the "most regulated" one on an ATX PSU.
From the 3 links I am pretty sure that the first boost converter (12 to 13.5V) is regulated and the rest are not.

I guess the reason for having 380V is so that you can modulate a 230Vrms sine wave and have some required margin in you HF type DC to mains inverter. Hence it does not need to be regulated in its intended use.

I would be a bit concerned about high frequency noise from the converters, but if it sounds and works good then you have saved money in the right place
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Old 8th March 2018, 05:11 PM   #6
kodabmx is offline kodabmx  Canada
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There is only 15mV of ripple on the 12V line. Correct. Only the first boost converter is regulated. The 380V becomes 440V by running it at 13.5V instead of 12V. That is the B+ for the power amp. The switching frequency is about 20kHz on the 500W inverter, and 37kHz on the 150W. Because of the high frequency a good filter can be made with a 1R/1000u. The 500W inverter has about a 20V drop from no load to load, which is fine since it's configured as a tetrode amp with regulated screens. There is no audiable noise, either. Especially 120Hz (I hate hum).
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Old 9th March 2018, 01:20 PM   #7
kodabmx is offline kodabmx  Canada
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Why was the name of this thread changed from "kanged" to "ganged"? It was NOT a typo, although it usually refers to code rather than hardware.
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Old 11th March 2018, 03:18 AM   #8
PRR is offline PRR  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodabmx View Post
Why was the name of this thread changed from "kanged" to "ganged"?...
Use the "triangle !" icon Click the image to open in full size. left of your top message to "report yourself". Say that "kanged" was the intended spelling.

I thot it was a typo. A moderator probably thought so also, and "helpfully fixed it". Not all us geeks know all the new jargon.
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Old 13th March 2018, 05:01 PM   #9
Lingwendil is offline Lingwendil  United States
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Spill the beans on how you did that nixie indicator, homie. I have yet to play with nixies, but will be building a source selector/preamp soon, and they sound like a neat addition!
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Old 13th March 2018, 05:55 PM   #10
kodabmx is offline kodabmx  Canada
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2 pole 11 position switch, one pole switches HV (280V through a 51k dropper) for the nixie, the other pole controls input through relays.



Band Channael Rotary Switch 2P11T 2 Pole 11 Position Dual Deck T1 | eBay


6 Channel Unbalanced Stereo or Balanced Mono Audio Input Selector Relay Module | eBay

Last edited by kodabmx; 13th March 2018 at 06:05 PM.
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