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Old 28th February 2013, 02:23 PM   #11
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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Jay, putting a scope in a few places would give you an ibdication of the noise present etc, it could be a bad sound card or somthing else, what people keep forgetting with computers and high speed switching digital circuits is the switching noise, and having a linear PSU is not going to change that.
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Old 28th February 2013, 02:38 PM   #12
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For the hard core, there is always the battery...
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Old 28th February 2013, 02:52 PM   #13
pdul is offline pdul  Denmark
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A lot of noise in a battery, though a different kind
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Old 28th February 2013, 03:37 PM   #14
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Add in a charging system to a battery operated device and you are full circle back to where you began. A battery is a poor solution for most things besides maybe a portable headphone amp running on very low power requirements.
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Old 28th February 2013, 03:40 PM   #15
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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And a battery powering a lap top will have SMPS's after it.
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Old 28th February 2013, 04:20 PM   #16
kouiky is offline kouiky  United States
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This might not be quite the answer you were looking for, but yes I can hear a switching power supply from some distance. What I hear are the subharmonics in the 15-20kHz range coming from the physical power supply itself. Internet routers, iPod usb chargers, certain TV sets and DVD players are the worst offenders, with routers being so bad I have to close them in another room. I had a Power over ethernet system in 2011 and it was painful.
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Old 28th February 2013, 04:35 PM   #17
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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Tinitus
Its a bit of a generalisation, do all SMPS's produce sub harmonics in that region, and if you can hear it you can record it, that would be interesting to see...
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Old 28th February 2013, 04:48 PM   #18
kouiky is offline kouiky  United States
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I don't have tinitus, my hearing threshold is 0dB from 4-8kHz which was regarded as very sensitive. The switch mode psu in my router is loud enough to record at a distance and has to be in a room away from me. Thats a good idea, I should record these things.
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Old 28th February 2013, 06:00 PM   #19
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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That is sensetive, one of my sons hearing is quite bad, and in that region, his is 20-60dB down in that region, so over the years I've learnt a lot about speach (he had speach therapy for over 10 years). Do voices sound over sibliant.
What worries me is that noisy SPMS's are generaly badly designed and EMC transmitters, and routers are one of the most competetive markets, so I know it is one area where cost cutting is rife.
Communications over power wont help, it is basicly EMC pollution and being on the mains can get into all sorts of equipement.
The reason why i mentioned tinitus, is that I suffer from it and when it kicks in certain frequecies seem that extreme they hurt, luckily I seem to have it under control most of the time.
What make is your router.
New multiphase spread spectrum SMPS's are much better than the older style single transformer or inductor versions, but again it comes down to cost, though as you can use smaller SMD magnetics the cost difference is not as bad as it might be. But they are only now filtering down in to consumer and commercial designs, but they are critical in their layout and effectivly you have x number of controllers plus discrete components, then the spread spectrum controller and the muliphase clock generator, good fun to do.
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Old 28th February 2013, 06:51 PM   #20
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Koiky,
I never thought of the router giving off noise but every time I sit at the computer I do hear a lot of high frequency noise and it does bother me when I tune into it, very distracting really.
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