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Old 16th February 2013, 08:54 PM   #1
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Default 12 SLA charging circuit for amp

Hi, I'm building a battery powered amp, and was am deciding what charging circuit to use.

One option- buy a plugpack sealed lead acid battery charger. The only annoyance is that you cant run the amp when the circuit is charging as the charger makes noise/hum as it switches.
I guess I could put heaps of filters and stuff between the battery and amp but I suspect the charger pulses the voltage on and off, which would be hard to filter.

Or I was thinking of just whacking a transformer in and put a regulator set to 13.8V. However I saw in another thread about it needing current limiting when charging a discharged SLA. What sort of circuit would be good for current limiting in this case?

Cheers,
Caleb
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Old 17th February 2013, 08:07 PM   #2
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just use a small low current transformer. There is no real need for current limiting
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Old 19th February 2013, 12:52 PM   #3
FoMoCo is offline FoMoCo  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whizgeek View Post
just use a small low current transformer. There is no real need for current limiting
There is a need for voltage limiting.
Also, the small transformer may overheat. Although it can't damage the battery, unless designed for it, transformers do not like sustained overloads.
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Old 20th February 2013, 11:24 PM   #4
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After looking at available transformers, I think I might go for a laptop power supply (16V) and put a regulator circuit, with a current limiting resistor before the regulator, maybe a few ohms. Would this slow down the charging too much? 16V -12V= 4V drop, with a 4ohm resistor to limit it at 1A charging current, which is within the rating of the PSU and the regulator. Is this calculation correct? Of course the current will be less due to internal resistance of the battery.
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Old 22nd February 2013, 03:55 PM   #5
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Just use a constant voltage charger made with a simple LM317 regulator set to 13.1-13.5V. The IC will current limit to a safe level, and you won't overcharge no matter how long you charge if you stay between those voltages. In addition, this supply should be quite enough to listen while you charge, though the regulator might not give enough current for the amp (we don't know anything about your amp).

Internal resistance of an SLA battery is like 0.003 ohms... that's not going to affect the currents you're dealing with at all.
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Last edited by Redshift187; 22nd February 2013 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 23rd February 2013, 07:29 AM   #6
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use a relay to detach the charger from the battery while the amp is on.
preferably a delayed relay setup would work as:
1. detach the charger
2. attach power to battery.

then when the amp is off, the charger should be re-attached to the battery.
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Old 23rd February 2013, 06:20 PM   #7
spwalek is offline spwalek  United States
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I use this circuit for exactly what you want to do and it works well.

Battery charger

you can feed it with a laptop brick, or a transformer and bridge. You do need to heatsink the lm317 though.
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Old 23rd February 2013, 07:24 PM   #8
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The transistor in the circuit is for current limiting, according to the website limiting to 1A. The LM317 will limit to 1.5A on its own, I don't think you need the added complexity.
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Old 23rd February 2013, 08:25 PM   #9
spwalek is offline spwalek  United States
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Tyler,

Yes but the SLA battery's charge requirements vary by size/amp hour etc. The added complexity just extends the life of the battery by limiting charge current to your specific SLA requirements. R = 0.6V / max current

Steve

Last edited by spwalek; 23rd February 2013 at 08:29 PM. Reason: added formula from link
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Old 23rd February 2013, 09:27 PM   #10
paulb is offline paulb  Canada
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Here is what I have used. I can't remember offhand whether it is for a 6V or 12V battery, probably 12V.
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