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Old 12th October 2012, 02:59 AM   #1
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Default Computer power supply mod?

I have a Sure 4 channel amp 4x100W @ 4 Ohm TK2050 Class-T Digital Audio Amplifier Board 320-302

I need a power supply for it. (the amp is unregulated, it NEEDS 24-30v to really work well)

Can I use a computer power supply? How can I modify the power supply to 24 or even 30 volts??
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Old 12th October 2012, 03:11 AM   #2
Einric is offline Einric  United States
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You may not be able to.
Most manufacturers will use parts that are slightly over rated for their purpose.
Most likely the capacitors in the Computer P/S would be 16-24V capacitors.
Beyond that the modern switching supplies are very type specific in order to get the high efficiencies.
You may be better off building an unregulated supply for your purposes.
Notice also printed on the board it says DC 6-26V in.
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Old 12th October 2012, 05:19 AM   #3
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If you have an ATX 2.x supply most of its output is on the 12 V . By loading the 5V with a couple of amps you can draw power from this 12 V .

Then build your own 12=> + - whatever voltage you need, ie a car audio power converter. Several topics cover this.

If it is a high Q supply ouput noise can be surprisingly low already to start with.
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Old 12th October 2012, 04:48 PM   #4
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^ can u please elaborate?
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Old 13th October 2012, 11:13 AM   #5
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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The 4x100W claim is a lie.
The amps are more like 30W+30W+30W+30W into rated loads for 0.1% distortion.
The realistic maximum load on the supply is ~120W.
A 160VA to 250VA transformer feeding a +-20mF PSU will do the job of powering these chipamps.
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Old 13th October 2012, 02:54 PM   #6
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what kind of transformers are in a computer power supply?

is a +-20mF PSU a capacitor?

I looked up the price of those transformers and they are big bucks... there has gotta be a cheaper way for a power supply for these things...
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Old 13th October 2012, 03:55 PM   #7
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a computer PSU will not avail to you the type of transformer you need to build a linear PSU.
the "+-20mF" was referring to using a 20000uF cap per rail (pos. & neg.) of a linear PSU.
if you need so much power you must pay the price and the linear PSU is probably the quicker/cleaner/cheaper way of doing it.
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Old 13th October 2012, 04:12 PM   #8
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by illnastyimpreza View Post
..........is a +-20mF PSU a capacitor?...
+-20mF could be assembled from a pair of 10000uF//10000uF, i.e. four 10mF caps to give +-20mF.

Can you see why it's easier to use m instead of 1000u?
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Old 13th October 2012, 06:32 PM   #9
sbrads is offline sbrads  United Kingdom
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Never tried it, but I don't see why you can't use 2 identical PC PSUs, with both 12v in series to give 24v.
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Old 13th October 2012, 06:51 PM   #10
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all computer PSU outputs are referenced to earth-ground which makes it rather problematic placing two of them in series to get 2x12=24. However, modern ATX PSUs can provide enormous amperage at 12 volts and thus amplifier bridge configurations into 4 ohms or lower can yield large output power.
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