Super Regulator, collecting the facts - Page 13 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Power Supplies

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th October 2003, 05:11 PM   #121
diyAudio Member
 
mrfeedback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Perth, Australia.
Default Curious About The Benefits.......

Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
"Not much, I suppose. <100 mA?"


>100 mA DC. The regulators will work better with load currents above 100 mA
than low current loads like 10 or 20 mA.

There is an extremely simple explanation for this for anybody who knows a little electronics.....

Anybody?
Mainly a question about how much this kind of regulator circuit improves sonics of what kinds of line (or other) stages, and with respect to other regulator techniques.
Out to what power is easily achievable ?.

Eric.
__________________
I believe not to believe in any fixed belief system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 06:01 PM   #122
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
diyAudio Member
 
peranders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Göteborg, Sweden
Blog Entries: 4
Default Re: More confused than I thought......

Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
"Not much, I suppose. <100 mA?"
>100 mA DC. The regulators will work better with load currents above 100 mA
than low current loads like 10 or 20 mA.

There is an extremely simple explanation for this for anybody who knows a little electronics.....

Anybody?
Not very suitable for a normal transistor amp then or a couple of opamps?
__________________
/Per-Anders (my first name) or P-A as my friends call me
Tube Buffered Gainclone in work |Thread || Diamond buffer |Thread for the group buy | Wiki
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 06:12 PM   #123
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Default Re: Re: More confused than I thought......

Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
"Not much, I suppose. <100 mA?"


>100 mA DC. The regulators will work better with load currents above 100 mA
than low current loads like 10 or 20 mA.

There is an extremely simple explanation for this for anybody who knows a little electronics.....

Anybody?

Higher current means higher gm of the pass transistor means
higher loop gain. Culd that be what you mean?


Quote:
Originally posted by peranders

Not very suitable for a normal transistor amp then or a couple of opamps?
A dummy resistor to ground will solve that. It's just a regulator,
not a nuclear power station.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 07:40 PM   #124
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
Question Resistance from a dummy...

Preloading regulators with a resistor is a VERY common technique and written about in TAA probably 15 years ago. This circuit was origionally developed as a regulator for low current preamp type circuits! Are Jan, Andy, and I the only ones that read all the TAA articles?

Christer,
Not quite on the guess, but you getting warmer*. The other way to lower the output impedance instead of increasing the amount of negative feedback (or increasing the open loop voltage gain, that is) would be to do what?


Peace,
Fred

*So is the regulator at increased current loading now that I think of it....
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 08:10 PM   #125
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
Default ta fel på avbild

"Fred, where does the picture come from?"

Sorry wrong schematic......
Attached Images
File Type: jpg new reg.jpg (23.1 KB, 1374 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 08:56 PM   #126
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Default Re: Resistance from a dummy...

Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
Preloading regulators with a resistor is a VERY common technique and written about in TAA probably 15 years ago. This circuit was origionally developed as a regulator for low current preamp type circuits! Are Jan, Andy, and I the only ones that read all the TAA articles?
I don't know if I've read them all, but I suspect not, which is
why I asked about the origin of that schematic.

Quote:

The other way to lower the output impedance instead of increasing the amount of negative feedback (or increasing the open loop voltage gain, that is) would be to do what?
Let's see, the output impedance of an emitter follower is
Vt/I if ignoring the source impedance, so higher current means
lower open loop output impedance and, needless to say,
lower closed loop output impedance. However, this is just
the other side of the same coin as the gm stuff, so maybe
that's not what you are after either.


Quote:

Peace,
Fred
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 09:33 PM   #127
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Auburn, WA (somewhere between Seattle and Tacoma)
Blog Entries: 1
Send a message via ICQ to Damon Hill
Where is the MOSFET version written up? How does
it compare with the original version?

I'm having some trouble keeping up with the BJT
variations.

--Damon

Hafler SE100 all-JFET preamp with Jung SR using AD797
working on bench supply using some flavor of Jung SR
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 11:29 PM   #128
diyAudio Retiree
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Spain or the pueblo of Los Angeles
"Let's see, the output impedance of an emitter follower is Vt/I if ignoring the source impedance, so higher current means lower open loop output impedance and, needless to say, lower closed loop output impedance.

Just det! Den skall inte spela någon roll spänning förstärkas

Peace,

Fred
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th October 2003, 11:38 PM   #129
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
"Let's see, the output impedance of an emitter follower is Vt/I if ignoring the source impedance, so higher current means lower open loop output impedance and, needless to say, lower closed loop output impedance.

Just det! Den skall inte spela någon roll spänning förstärkas

Yes, I realized later the gm wasn't very important, since it is
only the closed-loop gain that lowers the output impedance.
Anyway, this was interesting. I hadn't thought about this
before you challenged us with the question.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st October 2003, 12:48 AM   #130
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Köttbullar is swedish for meatballs. Isn't that the swedish chefs
specialty? It's been a long time since I watched the muppet show,
though.

BTW, the swedish chef doesn't sound very swedish at all to
swedish ears, but I recently heard the story behind this
character. It turns out there was a swedisch guy from a part
of Sweden called Dalecarlia (Dalarna in swedish) who worked
in the US. People from Dalecarlia sound a bit funny even to
many of us swedes (funny in a nice way, I should add).
Apparently he had quite a strong such accent also when
speaking english which people found so funny that they decided
to try imitating his way of speaking english when creating the
chef. I suppose that is the reason he ended up as a swedish
chef, and not some other arbitrary nationality.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:50 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2