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Old 3rd December 2010, 08:04 PM   #11
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I am not sure I think isolation transformers are as good as you do.

Have you heard what filter capacitors do for noise? I am pretty no system with an isolation transformer has ever done nearly as much, at least that I have heard.

Plus the expense of the ones that can do any where near 15/20a is through the roof.
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Old 3rd December 2010, 08:23 PM   #12
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How about a battery?

You could have maybe 2. Charge one and run off the other one. Or solar + battery. You need to dimension the system so the worst case sunlight provides enough daily power for your daily listening. Then you can isolate yourself from the mains completely.

w
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Old 3rd December 2010, 09:25 PM   #13
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I have no desire to be off the mains.

A really good idea came up. How could I cancel the signal that is attenuated by feeding the same signal back on it?

One idea is to have two capacitors running in parallel but one is off 180 off phase so the merger of information after them will cancel all the noise.

Unfortunately two sets of capacitors would be very expensive, so I need to find a way to do that instantaneously for fluctuations, without buying another set of capacitors.

One other idea that I do not know about is what happens if you turn AC into DC, but the DC circuit is in series... what happens to signal once it is turned into DC? Could I bleed the signal after it becomes DC with something like a light bulb or speaker?

The only way bleeding the signal that is the attenuated information would work in series with the capacitors is if it somehow put out zero signal or only 60hz. A small isolation transformer might work for this. Unfortunately I think it would be expensive, very. The idea is good though because I do not want an isolation transformer as the source of power.

Lastly how big of a resistor would I need to put in parallel with the circuit that is for the power of the equipment so that the attenuated information will never want to ground through my equipment, as in it will see that network as higher resistance even though the equipment I have will not see the resistance. I think I will use one of these. resistors_mills_mrc
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Old 3rd December 2010, 09:44 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroyer OS. View Post
I have no desire to be off the mains.
That's an odd thing to say.

I thought you had a desire to listen to music uncorrupted by noise.

I offered a workable suggestion as to how it could be achieved. Either with or without using the mains.

If you don't like it, don't use it, but it'll work and it's simple, unlike your noise cancelling solution, which is not simple and may never work.

w
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Old 3rd December 2010, 10:50 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroyer OS. View Post
I am not sure I think isolation transformers are as good as you do.

Have you heard what filter capacitors do for noise?
I very much doubt that mains noise is your problem so filtering may not be a solution PSU filters do a good job of removing mains noise by converting it to DC. A filter capacitor may filter out the high frequency components of the noise you are hearing making you believe that you have a solution. If your problem is a ground loop then the isolation transformer used properly will fix it that is why I suggested borrow one to see if it fixes your problem.

An isolation transformer is useless as a mains filter is used primarily for breaking ground loops.

Go through the signal path on your equipment and ask yourself how is this noise getting into it?

Just out of curiosity what is the AC voltage between ground and the two lines? I don't know much about the US electrical system but in Australia any significant voltage between neutral and ground may introduce mains noise into the signal path

Try plugging all your equipment into one power board, using multiple outlets can be a problem especially if the building wiring is bad.

Quote:
Plus the expense of the ones that can do any where near 15/20a is through the roof.
2.4Kw is a lot of power for an entertainment system especially in an apartment, try a 5 amp transformer for testing, it should handle the overload for 10 minutes check it after 5 minutes to see if it is getting hot.
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Old 3rd December 2010, 11:19 PM   #16
macboy is offline macboy  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroyer OS. View Post
...Unfortunately two sets of capacitors would be very expensive
"very expensive"? Just what kind of capacitors are you putting across your mains?!?
This is a mains filter capacitor. Less than a buck a piece. Free if you salvage them from old PC power supplies.
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Old 4th December 2010, 04:07 AM   #17
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What exactly do you want? Noise in the AC line is bled to neutral/ground through the filter caps. If your return lines have high resistance, something is broken, and it's going to be noisy. It's also not safe, in my opinion.

Fix yer mains!! :-) Or use an iPod with some earphones until your slumlord gets off his lazy duff.
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Old 4th December 2010, 10:04 PM   #18
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This is one of the most unproductive threads ever. There is nothing to "fix" you take things as is where I live. The landlords are not going to do anything.

I only use X2 capacitors by the way, high voltage rating.

So the main question now is how do I invert the signal running in parallel to the capacitors?
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Old 4th December 2010, 10:18 PM   #19
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Although I do fear this may require a second set of capacitors.

Inverted signal running parrallel, good, but how do I get the signal and not just line?
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Old 4th December 2010, 10:26 PM   #20
paulb is offline paulb  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroyer OS. View Post
This is one of the most unproductive threads ever. There is nothing to "fix" you take things as is where I live. The landlords are not going to do anything.

I only use X2 capacitors by the way, high voltage rating.

So the main question now is how do I invert the signal running in parallel to the capacitors?
The reason this thread is unproductive is because what you are asking for doesn't make any sense.
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