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Old 4th October 2010, 06:14 AM   #1
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Default Electrolitycs?

My Integrated needs eight (originally Elna 8200uF 71v Caps). Sorry, nubie question. Can I put larger,better, higher voltage caps in their place?
Assuming of course there is space. ie; Nichicon Super Through KG. Such as 80v 10000 or 15000 uF? Would this offset a loss of capacitance over time with no negative effects on the music?
I would also appreciate any better ideas.
Thanks, Tim
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Old 4th October 2010, 06:43 AM   #2
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Hi,

you can of course go for higher voltage caps (such as 80V or 100V) of your favorite brand if they fit in. But I would not go for much higher capacitance! If you can find 8200uF caps, go for them, or perhaps 10.000uF, but not more.
Much more capacitance means also a higher current when the amp is turned on. Transformer, rectifier and fuses have to be rated for that inrush current, and this what the manuafacturer did when he decided to put in 8x8200uF.

By the way, it's quite difficult to find something better than Elnas. But unfortunately these aren't available any more in such high values. A good replacement would be Nichicon, F&T, Vishay/BC, Panasonic TS-HA, Mundorf M-Lytic or BHC SlitFoils. But I think some of these are only available up to 63V, so you have to look for at least 80V ones (the 71V of your Elnas is quite uncommon these days).

This is a great site for caps:
AudioCap: The Audio Capacitor Online Shop

They offer BHC SlitFoils in 10.000uF/80V with only 35mm diameter (snap-in-type)

Or you have a look here (section: capacitors - electrolytics):
Parts ConneXion - The authority on hi-fi DIY parts and components

Regards!
Martin
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Old 4th October 2010, 06:52 AM   #3
Roushon is offline Roushon  India
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Default Soft start...

A soft start circuit as attached is very useful if you have high value caps in the
power supply.

See the below site for some more on this circuit.

http://mitglied.multimania.de/Promit...or_toroids.htm

Roushon
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File Type: jpg soft-start-for-power-supply-units.jpg (82.5 KB, 188 views)
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Last edited by Roushon; 4th October 2010 at 06:56 AM. Reason: Site added...
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Old 4th October 2010, 07:00 AM   #4
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Location: Melbourne
Use higher voltage and larger capacitors if they are available for a good price and they fit. (read the ESL and ESR specs first) There is no way to offset the loss in capacitance over time but larger capacitors have less loss on average because they hold more electrolyte. Were are talking decades for large filter capacitors kept cool, 32000uF per supply rail is a lot of filter capacitor so I doubt a bit of loss over time will make much difference, good amplifier designs have pretty good supply rejection meaning that the capacitors have little effect on the music other than to support a sagging power supply a bit longer.
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Old 4th October 2010, 07:10 AM   #5
Roushon is offline Roushon  India
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Location: Mumbai (Bombay)
Although it is not explicitly mentioned the soft start circuit is made for 220VAC mains.


Roushon
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Old 4th October 2010, 03:18 PM   #6
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Yes, you can go for larger capacitance, higher voltage capacitors. Preferrably keep your total capacitance about the same. Often higher voltage capacitors of the same capacitance have lower ESR ratings, which might be a good thing.

For example, if you have 65,600uF total capacitance, you could use 2x 2200uF and 4x 15,000uF (I would suggest putting the pair of 2200uF closest to the rectifiers). That would give you 64,400uF, very close to the original amount.
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