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Old 18th September 2010, 08:22 PM   #1
ggking7 is offline ggking7  United States
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Default Batteries for power amps?

Could a suitably large pack of A123 batteries be used to power a pair of these power amps:

Model 2200 Monoblock Power Amplifier

How could the battery pack be connected to the amps' IEC connectors?
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Old 18th September 2010, 09:11 PM   #2
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No. The IEC conector is for AC hook batterys up to it and the amp will blow up!
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Old 18th September 2010, 10:40 PM   #3
ggking7 is offline ggking7  United States
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What needs to go between the IEC connector and the batteries in order to make this happen?
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Old 19th September 2010, 12:29 AM   #4
amc184 is offline amc184  New Zealand
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If you want to run it on batteries without modifying it internally, you need to get an inverter. Be aware though that if you were intending to run it on batteries for improved sound quality, batteries and an inverter will not help. If you just want portability though, an inverter and batteries should do the job fine.
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Old 19th September 2010, 01:41 AM   #5
star882 is offline star882  United States
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You'll really want an efficient design for battery operation. Something like a TAS5630 powered from a boost converter.
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Old 19th September 2010, 03:21 AM   #6
ggking7 is offline ggking7  United States
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My apartment has very noisy AC power and the idea is that powering my amp via batteries would eliminate the noise problem. Would an inverter introduce a lot of electrical noise?

Would modifying the amps internally to accept DC from the batteries be a lot of work?
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Old 19th September 2010, 03:36 AM   #7
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Forget batteries+inverter! That completely cancels out the low noise and high current that batteries provide.

All you have to do is figure out how many VDC the power supply rails in your amp need, remove the transformer and diode bridge from the amp, and wire the correct number/series/parallel of batteries into where the dc-out of the diode bridge used to be.

This easy method only works with amps that have a positive rail and a ground rail, though, such as a Tripath amp. It wont work with amps with bi-polar rails unless you create a virtual ground, which is a lot more work with a high-power amp.

then you also need to figure out a charging solution with multiple 12 or 24v chargers.
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Old 19th September 2010, 05:48 AM   #8
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And forget about A123 batterys you would need batterys much much larger than those! Realy sounds like you need a power line conditioner.
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Old 19th September 2010, 09:56 AM   #9
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ggking7 View Post
My apartment has very noisy AC power
select equipment that already has good interference suppression.

Many DIYaudio projects forget this, but some do it very well.

Now go around and find which bits of kit are causing the mains noise. Is it the freezer, or TV, or fluorescent lamp, etc.?
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Old 19th September 2010, 05:51 PM   #10
ggking7 is offline ggking7  United States
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Quote:
Now go around and find which bits of kit are causing the mains noise. Is it the freezer, or TV, or fluorescent lamp, etc.?
I've done this extensively and here is my list of noise/interference sources in order of annoyance:

1. fluorescent light
2. unidentified noise, probably from adjacent apartments
3. 2 laptops and 1 desktop computer
4. refrigerator
5. dishwasher
6. electric hot water heater
7. noise introduced by turning on circuits even though nothing is using power on the circuits
8. TV
9. dimmer switch (bathroom light and almost always off)

I'd like to put cheap power filters on the computers, refrigerator, dishwasher, and TV. mouser.com has thousands of them and I'm not sure where to start:

Power Power Line Filters

Can anyone point me in the right direction with these?
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