120V DC Lead battery desulfator! Lightbulb and Bridge Rectifier! - Page 2 - diyAudio
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Old 1st May 2009, 08:59 PM   #11
luka is offline luka  Slovenia
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resting voltage should say the same, should be more then 12.3v even if fully discharged

One bad thing about this way of "charging" is, if your voltage is 14.4v or more, battery could overheat or even explode. So keep an eye on voltage
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Old 1st May 2009, 09:29 PM   #12
star882 is offline star882  United States
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I once done something similar 2 or 3 years ago but with a 5uF motor run capacitor and a light dimmer in series in place of the bulb. For what it's worth, the car battery I used it on still works fine.
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Old 1st May 2009, 09:55 PM   #13
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Thanks for the info. Now does anyone have a way to revive
NI-MH batterys?
 
Old 2nd May 2009, 12:10 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by luka
One bad thing about this way of "charging" is, if your voltage is 14.4v or more, battery could overheat or even explode. So keep an eye on voltage
Exactly! If I was a mod I would close this thread, but they just ignore me
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Old 2nd May 2009, 04:22 AM   #15
star882 is offline star882  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by woody
Thanks for the info. Now does anyone have a way to revive
NI-MH batterys?
I have read something about discharging them completely individually (using a resistor across each cell to avoid overdischarging weaker cells), timing in a 0.5C charge for just under 2 hours, and repeating the process a few times until the battery operates properly. I have never done it on any NiMH batteries, although I have done something similar on some NiCds a long time ago.
Quote:
One bad thing about this way of "charging" is, if your voltage is 14.4v or more, battery could overheat or even explode. So keep an eye on voltage
If the current is low enough (which it would be except for really small batteries), it will not be enough to be any safety hazard. In fact, "equalization" is often done on lead acids, which simply involves intentional overcharging followed by adding distilled water to replace the amount lost during equalization.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 05:22 AM   #16
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Exactly, the current is too low for any danger. I Desulfated a small lawnmower battery, and it actually went to a full-charge state after 12 hours, and it was slowly bubbling and gassing, but not so much to where it's dangerous.

Also on some bad car batteries that only stay up to 12.3-12.5 after sitting from a full charge, the 120V Desulfator eventually brings that sitting voltage over 12.6-12.8, because of that slow pulsating overcharge. After that, the battery will charge up to that higher voltage each time.

The battery doesn't usually get to over 14V unless it's small like that lawnmower battery. Usually it sits in the 13's because of the really low current. So far, so good.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 12:34 PM   #17
jkeny is offline jkeny  Ireland
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What about use in 220-230V mains areas?
 
Old 2nd May 2009, 01:33 PM   #18
star882 is offline star882  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by jkeny
What about use in 220-230V mains areas?
Use a capacitor about half the value and sufficient voltage rating. A common HVAC motor run capacitor will work fine.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 01:57 PM   #19
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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Hi JK,
how about using a 110V site isolating transformer?
240Vac input and 55-0-55Vac output.
And you are isolated from the mains as well as operating at the voltage that the originator suggests.

They are available from 500VA to 10kVA.
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Old 2nd May 2009, 03:14 PM   #20
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The isolation transformer would be GREAT for safety, although not required. One problem with rectification off the mains, is either the positive or negative lead is able to make a path to ground, which can be a shock hazard. An isolation transformer would take care of that for sure.

Even on 240VAC, you would do the same exact thing, using a 240V 60W lightbulb, and a bridge recitifier. The amount of voltage doesn't really matter, because the lightbulb in series drops most of the excess.

Now more about the motor-start capacitors..........I'm wondering if it would be much better for not wasting as much power as heat. Being a lightbulb is using ~60W, but the battery is only getting a fraction of that power, it looks like a capacitor may be the answer to making a HV desulfator without using so much wasted electricity - being you have to put it on for a few hours or days, that would be important.

What values would be suitable for 200-500mA? 1uf, 5uf, or more?
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