Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Power Supplies

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 7th March 2008, 02:14 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Send a message via MSN to engzonta
Default 2000W Power Supply for my car audio.

Hi everybody!

I want to make a power supply for my car audio system. For this, I need a 2.000W supply with 220Vac in and 12Vdc out 160A.
If anyone help me, I apreciate.

Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th March 2008, 02:19 PM   #2
Duo is offline Duo  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Duo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Send a message via ICQ to Duo
2000W at 12V is 167A


For car audio, you'll want something more around 13 - 14 volts.

The going standard here is 13.8V, due to the normal float voltage of lead acid batteries in many situations.

At 13.8V, 145A gives 2kW, however, you're going to want a supply capable of something more like 160A in that case just so you're not pushing its limits.

Then again, how often will you use the entire 2000W?
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th March 2008, 02:26 PM   #3
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
is the car amp capable of using 2kW?
Can the speakers draw 145Apk?
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th March 2008, 02:28 PM   #4
Duo is offline Duo  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Duo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Send a message via ICQ to Duo
I'm guessing he's either using multiple car amplifiers or if it's one, it's rather large.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th March 2008, 02:40 PM   #5
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
The common advice is just to buy some home audio power amps capable of driving your speakers, it will probably cost about the same.
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote
Old 7th March 2008, 02:51 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Melbourne, OZ
Look for a big switchmode power supply on ebay - I've seen some ones pulled from servers that put out 12V or 24V at several KVA.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12th March 2008, 07:47 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Send a message via MSN to engzonta
Thanks for all. I need a project of a power supply with output voltage around 13.8Vcc, but I will not use in parallel with the car battery. I will only use the supply. For this, the supply does not need to be float.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th March 2008, 02:06 AM   #8
Duo is offline Duo  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Duo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Send a message via ICQ to Duo
This is a really big supply relative to most stuff people 'build' as projects.

As a linear supply, this is simple, but requires a lot of BIG parts. Big rectifiers, big transformer, big caps, failsafes of sorts.

As a SMPS power supply, this is tricky for the DIY person as when anything goes wrong, it blows up rather catastrophically due to the high-power nature of the circuit.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th March 2008, 11:13 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
You could rewind two microwave oven transformer with 13 volt secondary. Wire the primary's in series for 240v, run em in parallel for 120v.

I doubt you will quite get 2000 watts but it will be close. Big car amps actual power ratings are almost always a few times what they actually are anyways. If you don't have three alternators on your car, your amp is not drawing 2000 watts.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th March 2008, 12:36 AM   #10
Duo is offline Duo  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Duo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Send a message via ICQ to Duo
If you re-wind microwave transformers, you must remove the shunts from the core unless you want a current-limited output.

These appear as bars of core material in the window of the transformer between the primary and secondary windings and shunt a magnetic path from the inner leg to the outer legs, causing saturation at a certain point and allowing current regulation so that the magnetron doesn't just draw limitless current.

MOTs are very useful for home-brew transformers, both current limited and not.

  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lateral Mosfet Amplifers 250W - 2000W RMS Power Amplifier modules Class-D Design Vendor's Bazaar 162 27th October 2011 12:17 AM
Can i use a computer power supply to power audio amplifiers? destroyer X Solid State 91 25th September 2006 04:36 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:13 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2