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Old 7th January 2006, 02:54 PM   #11
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This is typical fluorescent light fixture louver material, 1/2" cubes.
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Old 8th January 2006, 12:23 AM   #12
Mark Kravchenko --- www.kravchenko-audio.com
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Default I like your idea!

WHen you think about the tension that is required to keep everything good and flat it is a great help to distribute it along the entire length of egg crate. Keeps it flat not bowed as it has a tendency to do when you tension it from the ends only.

With the correct viscosity the epoxy will ensure that the wires are fastened well and there will little to no extraneous vibration to! Again nice work indeed. Something that I will definitely try when I build mine.
Thanks for the pictures.

MArk
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Old 8th January 2006, 01:35 AM   #13
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Mark,
Yes--after epoxy is rolled onto the surface, the eggcrate is turned upside down and placed on the wire. In this way, the glue tends to flow downward and into the wire/crate contact point, producing the visible fillet.

I keep thinking that my method was excessively work intensive, but I'm not sure this can be avoided regardless of technique when fabricating wire stators. Actually, most of the work I recall entailed developing the technique. The actual jig was not that hard to make.
I'll draw up an illustration if anybody is interested.

I think that is #24 nylon insulated magnet wire, purchased from Mouser.
Moray James double insulated suggestion may be better.

Regarding vibration: Actually, the copper wire - acrylic crate produces a composite structure that does seem to be fairly inert. Stators made with Styrene crate is less so and did not sound as good, but is still acceptable.
Dave
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Old 8th January 2006, 02:36 AM   #14
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Instead of copper wire, why not use hardened tool steel wire/rod like the stuff they make drill bits out of? It's not like you need a low resistance wire as your diaphram constant charging circuit is ~10MΩ. That should get you the rigidity you want without much tension on the frame assembley.
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Old 9th January 2006, 08:43 AM   #15
Atom666 is offline Atom666  Canada
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Here is a picture of my streching frame
Andrew
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Old 9th January 2006, 08:43 AM   #16
Atom666 is offline Atom666  Canada
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And another
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Old 9th January 2006, 11:01 AM   #17
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Yes--Nice, much less complex tham mine. Do you have a shot with wire?
How does it work?
Dave
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Old 9th January 2006, 02:04 PM   #18
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Hi,

light diffusers are OK, but to avoid any issue with cavity resonances i make my frame out of "pertinax", which is isolating hardpaper. Light diffuser get briddle under UV-radiation and in addition the adhesion of epoxy to polysterene get worse over the time.

The wires i use are very thin (0,0035") and open area is 50%. This requires 96 wires for 0,78" cell width.

The key to success (and the cheapest stator) is the jig to stretch the wires. Wires will never arc at even very high stator voltages and you can easily apply segmentation to reduce high frequency directivity.

capaciti
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Old 9th January 2006, 03:59 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally posted by Capaciti
Hi,

light diffusers are OK, but to avoid any issue with cavity resonances i make my frame out of "pertinax", which is isolating hardpaper. Light diffuser get briddle under UV-radiation and in addition the adhesion of epoxy to polysterene get worse over the time.

The wires i use are very thin (0,0035") and open area is 50%. This requires 96 wires for 0,78" cell width.

The key to success (and the cheapest stator) is the jig to stretch the wires. Wires will never arc at even very high stator voltages and you can easily apply segmentation to reduce high frequency directivity.

capaciti
I'm unsure of the whether cavity resonance is actually a problem with diffuser material. I think for 1/2" cubes the predicted resonance frequency is around 14 khz, but possibly of very low Q since the cavity length approaches and in fact equals the cavity width.

Moreover, the equations describe the behavior of a single cavity. A diffuser consists of a cluster. Just taking some partially educated guesses here. Open to correction.

In any case, I've never heard any coloration that remotely suggests substantial cavity resonance problems. That being said, your method certainly guarantees no cavity resonance, and is very elegant.

Acrylic seems to be superior to styrene in most respects. It resists deterioration and I think it sounds better, but have not rigorously sought to prove this. Epoxy bonds are stable, but I thoroughly sand the surface prior to gluing.
Dave
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Old 9th January 2006, 06:26 PM   #20
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Quote:
I coated the acrylic louver with epoxy, turned it upside down, placed it on the wire and weighted it with another piece of glass, foam, mdf, and about 100 lbs of sand bags. Dave [/B]
If you have a vacuum pump you could borrow a technique from composite lay-up and vacuum bag the assembly to apply pressure while the epoxy hardens. A small diaphragm pump can easily pull about 20" Hg vacuum which translates to 10 lbs per sq inch over the entire surface. Model rocket and airplane guys often use vacuum food sealers for this job.


Question for Capaciti:
With so many fine wires, how do you make the electrical connections? I am thinking that a single connection to one end of the wire in each stator might be a problem with so much wire acting as an inductor. Do you run some sort of bus connection down the length of the driver?

I_F
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