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Old 1st March 2004, 03:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
maybe with the TEK R7704 I am desparately trying to give away
i would like to have it, but it will be too expensive to ship to europe...
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Old 1st March 2004, 03:51 PM   #12
awboy is offline awboy  Netherlands
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Default Re: Voltmeter to monitor an Electrostatic speaker 10000 Volt power supply

A supply with its output voltage dropping by loading it with 10 Gohm is not a power supply.

Quote:
Originally posted by kermeeng
monitoring a 10000V power supply greater than 10,000,000,000 ohms

George Kermeen
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email dudleydesigns@aol.com
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Old 1st March 2004, 05:46 PM   #13
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Default Re: Re: Voltmeter to monitor an Electrostatic speaker 10000 Volt power supply

Quote:
Originally posted by awboy
A supply with its output voltage dropping by loading it with 10 Gohm is not a power supply.

Well not quite - the high voltage power supply of an electrostatic speaker is typically set up with high impedance on purpose for a number of reasons. The most important (functional) is to keep current from flowing as the diaphragm moves (i.e keeping the charge constant much like a restrictor). (Also note that high voltage electronics does not work quite like we are used to)

Now, I recommend that you use an electrostatic voltmeter for such duty as you will most likely draw down the voltage significantly just by loading it.

Petter
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Old 1st March 2004, 06:45 PM   #14
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what is the electrostatic voltmeter else than a capacitor?
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Old 1st March 2004, 07:41 PM   #15
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Default Conclusion VL can be measured with 100,000,000,000 ohm meter with less than 1% error

Thank you all for the help.

In response to Petter's recommendation.

Has anybody got approximate impedance figures RS for high voltage power supplies?

From the assumption that the probe has 1,000,000,000 ohm input resistance RP say (RS catalogue Stock No 360-0300)

and dhaen's internet reference as follows

Why don't I get 6kV when I measure the EHT's Bass Panel pin?Are you using an electrostatic voltmeter? (Probably not) If you are using a probe attached to an ordinary DVM then expect to read somewhere around 3.9 to 4.2 kV with no bass panels connected and a perfectly good EHT supply.

I estimate an electrostatic HV power supply resistance RS

can be calculated from the power supply open circuit voltage VP = 6KV

The estimated probe resistance RL = 1,000,000,000 ohms

and the loaded power supply voltage VL = 3.9KV


from

VL = VP * RL/(RS+RL)

VL*RS + VL*RL = VP*RL

RS =RL * (VP-VL)/ VL = 1 * (6-3.9)/3.9 = 0.538 G Ohms
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Old 1st March 2004, 09:23 PM   #16
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It is a capacitor as is pretty much every thing else

The way it works is that two very thin sheets of metal separate as the voltage gets too high. In effect, what happens is that electrostatic forces force these apart. The good news is that it is infinite resistance. The bad news is that it is not particularly accurate ...

so I did a search on Google and one of the links that came up was http://www.electrotechsystems.com/Pr....asp?ProdID=67 which seems to be a similar sort of thing except that technology has advanced since I went to college

Petter
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Old 1st March 2004, 10:10 PM   #17
SY is offline SY  United States
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Well, normally the polarizing supply is connected to the diaphragm through a large resistor, like 100 megs or more. Make sure you're checking things on the power supply side of that resistor.
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Old 17th April 2004, 01:49 AM   #18
extremy is offline extremy  United States
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Default an extra warning,

I thought I'd hop in here too.

Anything more than 50 volts is capable of killing a person. Much lower voltages may kill if current is high.

We read of ideas to try to be safe handling higher voltages in this thread.
Here's my advice. A heavy set of rubber gloves over a set of light weight leather gloves, but only used if power is turned off and leads checked for potential power. Then and only then hook up your test probe and back away to power up. At no time ever, get within touching range while the power is on!
Each time you shut down, check for potential energy on each lead before handline( with gloved hands ).
Using "some sort of plastic" sounds like an accident waiting to happen. Sorry, but true. My advice is find something electrically suitable or forget this step.


Guys remember this, learning the meaning of safety late, cannot bring back the past once you get hurt or worse. Work safe with safe tools. Think about your tools being safe for each project.

Here's for continuing this thread. I hope there's some rewarding reading following!!!

GH
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Old 17th April 2004, 01:56 AM   #19
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Just adding my two sense.

Could a step down transformer help here?

I know thats a huge step down.
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Old 17th April 2004, 02:23 AM   #20
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An infinite voltage with 10^-30A will not damage ANYTHING.
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