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Old 13th December 2011, 05:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geraldfryjr View Post
I wish you luck as I was searching they said that it was out stock.
Amazon? Still says in stock as I type.

http://www.amazon.com/Craftsman-Comp...3800324&sr=8-1
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Old 13th December 2011, 05:23 PM   #12
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Cool,Go for it !!!


jer
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Old 13th December 2011, 05:45 PM   #13
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Just an observation and not to knock the efforts and hard work of those building their own insulated stators, that said posts of late should be a good reminder of the difficulties of building with this method. Building with mill sped insulated wire to me is a far less complex process. Not that building insulated wire stators don`t have there own issue because they do just that I believe they are minor in comparrison to insulated perf metal builds. Keep up the good work. Best regards Moray James.
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Old 13th December 2011, 07:09 PM   #14
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I would love to give a try to building some wire stators especially out of some Kynar coated 30ga wire wrap wire.

But for me it is the cost factor of 10:1 to even 20:1 and is the very reason that I don't/haven't used any perforated metal panels as well.

But I do use the same materials as the acoustats construction though.

It is the cheapest way I have found to build panels with very very very satisfying results.
So they are not as pretty as a perforated metal panel, but the results is the same if not better.
I have no claim to it being actually better as I don't have one to compare it to.

But they do sound awesome as a pair of 1' X 4' panels cost less than $20 using a powder coated method as using spray can painting drives the cost up a bit.

It is okay to use that method as it has taken me some time and money to get to the point of being able to buy the the paint in bulk and the equipment to spray it as well.
But the PC coating is best performance I have witnessed so far and that didn't cost me anything originally.
Even if I do end up having to hit it with a few coats of clear.
But as far as cost of the material it is a lot cheaper than paint so the performance to cost ratio is very high.

The biggest thing that held me back from pursuing this was what would be a suitable and reusable frame that was cheap to build and could withstand the heat of the oven.
PC was a fairly new technology even in 2003 and it wasn't until much later that I found out that would could actually be used as a frame to hold the wire mesh and the PC was starting to be used on wood as well.
It was about this time that the Eastwood Home PC kit appeared on the market (2004 to 2005).

The coating it self can be had for $10 to $30 for a 10 or 20 pound bag this is a lot of material as well as what is not used can be recovered and reused.
this intrigued me very much.

This is when Roger Sanders had explained to me that you want a high dielectric strength but choose one that has the highest Dielectric Constant over the selections of the highest strength.

Well this made a lot of sense as well but I did not understand why until much later after I did some studying on capacitors.
Because no matter how high you raise that voltage you can only go so far as the air begins to breakdown and this represents the resistance of the coating and the air combined.
But by raising the dielectric constant this raises the capacitance of the panel doing this lowers the impedance of the panel and this good as well.
I still barely understand why.

That is a very good point ,Moray,it is a bit more labor intensive but well worth the headache for the out come.
As well as all of the duds that one would get from the coater dude because he doesn't understand or care about the product that you are trying to create.
Let alone what it takes to test the panel as to them time is money and that is all they think about.
"Gee the Coating looks good to me" Yea,until a get it home and it is loaded with micro cracks and have to do it all over again at their convenience and then they charge you more for their time.
Then the question still remains "will it work this time ,what did he do that was different?"

Luckily my coater guy was only 15 minutes away and was willing to work with me but still the travel time cost and it was still only at his convenience as his shop was full of stuff that made him some money.

He knew what I wanted and couldn't give me a quote.
All he could say was that I have a minimum charge of $35 and asked him how many screens can I get done for that he just said "alot" and I asked how many,no answer.

jer
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Old 20th December 2011, 02:14 PM   #15
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The Craftsman powder coater was delivered today. Got here faster than expected, didn't even have a chance to buy any powder yet.

The unit seems decent for what I paid for it, a steal actually. I would never have paid the original ~$180 for it though, not even half that. If it works at all I will probably buy another one (or two) before they are gone.

This thing has the biggest wall-wart I have ever seen. It also makes a nice ozone generator. I put my hand close to the end while testing it and there was a visible purple glow around the electrode tip and I immediately smelled ozone. It left a lingering ozone smell on my hand.

BTW, I didn't realise this thread was in the planar/exotics when I posted. I don't plan on coating any stators.
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Old 20th December 2011, 02:51 PM   #16
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That's okay,it will be interesting to read about your experience with the unit anyhow.
Let us know what type of coating you try as well.

jer
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Old 22nd December 2011, 12:52 PM   #17
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I attempted my first piece yesterday. It didn't turn out that great, but it was completely my fault for not doing enough research first. The part I did was cast aluminum and since I wasn't aware of the prep work required I had some fish-eyes and plenty of orange peel. It looks like a really bad spray paint job, but man this stuff is insanely durable.

The gun itself works OK, but I'm sure it's complete junk compared to a real setup. It makes quite the mess as well. It also seems to waste a lot of powder, I mean a lot of it doesn't transfer to the part. Don't know if there is the same amount of waste with a pro setup or not.

All in all not a bad investment for $27 (plus $5 for the powder). I think I have a lot of learning to do before I get any acceptable results though.

Oh, and the powder cup does not clean up easily. The instructions say to just rinse it out with water, but the powder seems semi-hydophobic and just clumps in all the corners and edges of the cup.
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Old 22nd December 2011, 01:51 PM   #18
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Yes, There will be some waste of the powder.
But if you can reclaim it, it is re-useable.

There is some prep work that needs to be done when coating aluminium exactly what the process is I am not sure of what else besides cleaning it throughly with a non oily solvent.

Some research I have done suggests a phosphating process of some sort.
But you wouldn't do this if you were clear coating some polished Aluminium rims I don't think.

Some of the waste could be caused from the possibility of the gun running at a much lower voltage than a high volume system as they are in the 40Kv 100Kv range.
In one of the charts I have found says that a voltage range of about 10Kv to 20Kv is for about 10cm and less distance from the gun (or fluidized bed) to the part.

Other than the looks of the quality of the finish I am glad to hear that it works well.
From what I understand it is almost imparable to have a variable voltage to get a good finish sometimes, Depending on the application,as well as practice just like spraying paint I guess.

I will do some more research and see what I can find out.

jer

P.S. Yes the stuff is very tough !!!

Last edited by geraldfryjr; 22nd December 2011 at 01:55 PM.
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Old 22nd December 2011, 03:01 PM   #19
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Well I learned for cast parts, at the very least you need to de-gas the part at about 50 degrees higher than the powder cure temp.

I guesstimate the voltage of this system to be a little over 20kV.
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Old 22nd December 2011, 08:58 PM   #20
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Here is some good info,

Fortress Fusion :: Aluminum :: color galv powder coating paint over galvanizing

Powder Coating: Enhancing Powder Adhesion on Aluminum

Powder Coating Aluminum. Best Aluminum Powder Coating in Austin, TX.

Powder Coating Tips. Great Tips for Powder Coating Finishing In Texas.

What Is Powder Coating

Powder-Coatings by Wibrow Zinc Plating

http://www.powdergun.com/pdf/PRETREA...%20COATING.pdf

This is the Google search link that I used,

prepping aluminium for powder coating - Google Search

A weak solution of lye (sodium Hydroxide) can be used to wash the part and then rinse well and let dry and maybe prebake the part.
I am wondering if Phosphoric acid might work as a corrosion inhibitor treatment,I have some and I will give it a try once I get to that stage.

That is all I have for now as I have to go and do some more Holiday Shopping.



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