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Old 6th December 2007, 09:04 PM   #1
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Default Can a mylar rip be repaired?

Working on trading for a set of DIY panels to start me off. Only problem is one of them has a rip in the mylar about 1" long about 1.5" off the side of the panel.

Can it be repaired without redoing the whole shebang?

Thanks,
Jeff
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Old 6th December 2007, 09:23 PM   #2
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In a word, no. Sorry, I feel for you, I'm dealing with a similar issue.
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Old 7th December 2007, 04:58 AM   #3
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Default well you could....

pot the torn section with silicon adhesive on both sides. You will have to insure that the diaphragm stays in the centre of the stators so no bias charge bleeds off to either stator. This will (if properly done) result in a dead spot on the diaphragm which is no big deal. Probably worth trying as you have diddly to lose anyhow.
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Old 7th December 2007, 12:14 PM   #4
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After some research I was going to try to do the MAG fixes. Seems like they have this problem a lot.

This is a snip from the site, I would have to modify the process but I think that if I can get it to glue good, I could probably fix the tension with a blow dryer. I have a heat gun over here but I think that it may be too much heat. They are using 3m super 77 glue and mylar tape for this fix. They also relieve the tension on the panel before doing this. I do not know if I can do that on an ELS panel without distroying it.

I believe that the repair will have to be done from the non-conductive side. This looks to me like it *may* work, if I can get into the panel to do the repair.

"How to repair damaged mylar.

Remove/separate the magnet/Mylar (the metal frame that holds the is the central part of the speaker), separate it from the frame. Carefully pull off the metal braces that run across the width of the front side of the speaker (this allows the speaker to curve a little more. You may even want to flex the speaker, or brace or have someone flex the speaker to create a curve in the speaker so the Mylar is loose across the width of the speaker. Trim a piece of strong 3M tape or piece of Mylar if magnepan will supply. Take some Pieces of paper towel or thin plastic, and slide it in the hole - make sure to tuck the edges under the Mylar. Cover the rest of the speaker you don't want sprayed. Spray the 3M super 77 spray glue, wait 1 minute, pull out the paper towel/plastic in the hole, and lay down the piece of Mylar / 3M tape(glue side up - not down). Let dry for at least 1 hour. Trim another piece of tape or Mylar sprayed with 3M super 77 glue( let glue dry a couple of minutes before you lay it down. Lay down and stretch out as much as you can as you lay it down. Use 3M Spray glue or stronger 3M high strength spray glue to re-attach the metal braces (use c - clamps to hold each side of each brace). The re-attaching of the metal braces will flatten out the speaker panel, and stretch out the repaired area. I have done this repair for areas as large as 2" wide and 5" high with very good results."

Jeff
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Old 7th December 2007, 02:49 PM   #5
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If you "detension" the mylar by removing it from the frame you may as well just replace the whole thing.

I have patched tears in my Quad ESL-63 diaphragms on a temporary basis with scotch tape and with mylar film and contact cement. Both will work fine for a short period, maybe a year or so, but you really need to replace the entire diaphragm.

When a tensioned diaphragm tears the edges of the tear curl and get very close to the stators. This causes hissing and whining. By securing those edges with tape or film and cement you keep them away from the stators and stop the noise. The tension on the diaphragm has been reduced by the tear, so it ultimately needs to be replaced, but tape is a good temporary fix until you're ready to do the job right.

If you extend the tape beyond the ends of the tear, it may help prevent the tear from expanding. Don't apply heat to "tension" it after the repair. You'll end up making the tear expand.

Of course, this works best for small tears such as the OP's. If you have one that runs the length down the center of the driver you're probably SOL and need to do the replacement right away.

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Old 7th December 2007, 03:25 PM   #6
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I have a bunch of business letters with the clear windows (damn bill companies) that are tear proof ( at least I am too wimpy to rip them) do you think that they will work for the repair? These are clones of the Audiostatic models.

I just want to get something up and running so that I keep my enthusiasm level up.

Thanks,
Jeff
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Old 8th December 2007, 01:30 PM   #7
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In a word: Scotch-tape. You'll be back up and running in seconds.

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