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-   -   Ceramic spherical midrange dome (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/planars-exotics/109985-ceramic-spherical-midrange-dome.html)

Ed Holland 12th October 2007 08:42 PM

Ceramic spherical midrange dome
 
I was browsing for something completely different, related to radio tuners and found this:

http://www.murata.com/speaker/es024.html

Their efficiency seems very low at circa 70dB/W but at least this is an interesting concept - the "squawker" dome reproduces from 350 Hz upward and is implemented as an omnidirectional source.

Cheers,

Ed

Stocker 13th October 2007 04:15 AM

those cost how much, and they want you to believe the sound doesn't do horrible things bouncing off the slitted plate on top? fun.

theAnonymous1 13th October 2007 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Stocker
those cost how much, and they want you to believe the sound doesn't do horrible things bouncing off the slitted plate on top? fun.
Their line of super tweeters cost $2-3k depending on the model, so I'm sure the ES024 is >$4k. And for all that money you get "360 degree" piezo sound with a max spl of around ~90db.:whazzat:

Stocker 14th October 2007 02:57 AM

what, that's plenty for easy listening. put it behind your couch for playing AM radio through, etc. :whazzat:

Ed Holland 15th October 2007 04:10 PM

Well, OK - I just threw this one up out of interest because it was unusual, but had no idea there was such a high cost associated with their products. :bigeyes:

Never mind..

Ed

Andersonix 24th October 2007 03:07 PM

"Because the resonant frequency is set above the playback frequency, the speaker is extremely fast."

Surely something got lost in translation (from Murata, maker of power tools), but I don't think these have a resonant frequency over 30kHz. What do they mean?

djQUAN 24th October 2007 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Tosh
"Because the resonant frequency is set above the playback frequency, the speaker is extremely fast."

Surely something got lost in translation (from Murata, maker of power tools), but I don't think these have a resonant frequency over 30kHz. What do they mean?


Quote:

Resonant frequency: 120 Hz (woofer); 24 kHz (squawker)
what do they mean? I have no idea. :smash: :smash: :smash:

el`Ol 24th October 2007 04:05 PM

This company`s midwoofers and subwoofers have an Fs that lies above their operating range:
http://www.translife.de
They overcome the problems of limited SPL by building line arrays.
In my eyes this Murata speaker is good for acoustic measurements, but not for hifi.

Ed Holland 24th October 2007 04:20 PM

Hey Tosh - Where are you? My profile is out of date, and should say Mountain View, rather than Oxford.

What I found interesting about the murata dome is that unlike a tweeter, with a coil delivering vibrational force at the edge, they used different modes, presumably thereby obtaining a very different pattern of dispersion.

I guess the "grille" affair is intended further to modify this dispersion to limit vertical output. Earlier comments about its possible adverse effects upon sound quality are duly noted.

Ed

Andersonix 24th October 2007 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Ed Holland
Hey Tosh - Where are you? My profile is out of date, and should say Mountain View, rather than Oxford.

Ed

That's funny, because mine is also out of date. We're living in London for a year, having just spent 3.5 years in Mtn Vw and then Santa Clara... Email me!


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