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-   -   Linux audio is the way go, No its not (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/pc-based/232019-linux-audio-way-go-no-its-not.html)

console 14th March 2013 03:11 AM

Linux audio is the way go, No its not
 
I am in my 50s and know some of my hearing is gone, I would like to know why Linux audio is the way go.

Windows Foobar, clean sound, easy setup.
Windows Jriver, clean sound, easy setup.
Dare I say Windows Media player clean sound, easy setup.
So what do I get with Linux that the above fall short on.
Please if possible use bullet points. Easier for 50 plus fossils.

I don't get it, is it just another its harder so the unwashed masses won't do it?

TMHutson 14th March 2013 06:27 PM

I have only started my research on linux audio, as I am attempting to gut an old computer that works great and turn it into a music server.
Although I have no problem with hardware, I don't know much about software or programming.
What I do understand, is that when you use windows, you also use all the crap software that is attached to the Operating system (thanks, Bill Gates). You can't remove any of it.
Linux allows you to set up your OS so that you can have a minimum of things running in background, and less crap taking up space on a hard drive. So little space, that people run their computers off of little thumb drives in stead of hard drives. You can then connect a large hard drive to store your music (externally through network or internally).

With an OS like linux set up for audio only, it uses much less energy from the power supply and you can run fanless a bit easier. Some people even adjust the voltage going to the chip set to underclock it...
I am trying to set up my computer so that is uses separate power supplies for the hard drive, dac, or any converters I connect.
The other trick is to make sure you only use the USB for the dac/external sound card...
There are still arguments for/against internal vs external sound cards.
But many think external is the way to go..

You can run both windows and linux by doing a boot up from a thumb drive.
This will allow you to safely mess around with linux as you learn how it works.
If it offers you no benefits, is too complicated, or you just don't like it, you can go back to windows.
You won't know the benefits completely until you try it...
I am going to play with linux on an old computer, and need to re-install windows anyways.
I don't mind playing with linux.
I am going to play with the OS and see what happens...
So, I will be watching this thread (if it goes anywhere)...

Linux does NOT play music...

The program you install does (foobar, jriver or whatever).
Linux is just a way for computer savvy people to manipulate the OS so that it only does what you want it to do.
I don't want IE, Office, Word, or anything on my computer. I am not even going to use it for internet access... Not even movies.
Stereo music playback only.... I want this thing to be the best sounding it can.
Fanless, or big cabinet that is sound proof....

It's harder, because many people don't have the fortitude or patience to mess with programming. I am not scared of it, or lack the intellect. I am just lazy :D
From what I have seen online, it should not be that hard because there is a big following, and you can find people to help you...

I think that the only reason to go linux, is that you like to mess with computer programming, you want a smaller more simple computer for music only, or don't want to buy a new computer.
You can get bit perfect sound with the proper card. You just have to know how to set it up.
My current external sound card does not support asio, but I know how to bypass the "kmixer" so that is not as problem. I would worry less about linux, and worry more about bitperfect or asio type sound quality. I doubt there would be much of a difference in "sound quality" between windows and linux if both are set up with the same sound card running asio or bit perfect set up (windows 7)...
I am still learning about kernel streaming.
There are so many ways to set up the sound on windows and linux I am still learning...
I have foobar with the asio plug in, but it does not work with my sound card :(
I have to get a new card.

I hope someone makes a bullet point list for you. I will be reading it as well.
I think it helps to make a plan, and document it all. Share with everyone your goals for the system as well.
What motherboard you have, power supply, chip set, sound card, dac, OS... Everything effects the sound... Not just the player...
How are you connecting the computer to the amplifier (or receiver)?
What sound card are you using?
Good luck...

counter culture 14th March 2013 08:46 PM

1. Windows - no support for USB class 2 audio. Microsoft won't commit to providing it, Linux has it already.

2. Windows - doubles the cost of a basic box not including monitor, Linux is available free. Windows can be as much as U$200 depending on Microsoft's current discounting. A lot of money to add to the cost of a hacked music server.

3. Windows - more vulnerable to hacks than Linux and more targeted, particularly in the case of desktops as opposed to servers.

I'm not an unequivocal advocate of Linux - who wants an OS that allows you to start up an application and then won't allow you to access the disk because you're not logged in as root (which happened to me recently with Audacity on a Raspberry Pi), that makes you prefix every command line instruction with sudo just to get it to happen.

It will, however, do pretty much anything you need to do without costing you a penny, which is an important consideration, and it's all open source, you can dig into it and tinker with any part of it if you want to. Hard work in some instances, but a long way from impossible, which some things are in Windows.

Don't get me wrong, this is a Windows box. Windows XP. I don't anticipate buying another copy of Windows unless it's installed on laptop, and I know plenty of commercial operations that feel they have only money to lose by moving on to a later version.

You (don't) pays your money and you takes your choice.

phofman 14th March 2013 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by counter culture (Post 3410992)
who wants an OS that allows you to start up an application and then won't allow you to access the disk because you're not logged in as root (which happened to me recently with Audacity on a Raspberry Pi), that makes you prefix every command line instruction with sudo just to get it to happen.

I do. If that is the way permissions are set up in this particular case, I am very glad the OS respects them. I am very glad resources priviledged for the superuser are not available to regular users (hence sudo).

But I can always change the permissions, make root able to login, use sudo -i instead of plain sudo, have mounted drives available to regular user, and lots of other ways to make my life easier.

phofman 14th March 2013 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by console (Post 3409916)
I would like to know why Linux audio is the way go.


It is the way to go for those who want to use linux. Just like you want to use windows. It is that simple.

counter culture 14th March 2013 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phofman (Post 3411000)
I do. If that is the way permissions are set up in this particular case, I am very glad the OS respects them. I am very glad resources priviledged for the superuser are not available to regular users (hence sudo).

But I can always change the permissions, make root able to login, use sudo -i instead of plain sudo, have mounted drives available to regular user, and lots of other ways to make my life easier.

Fine, but I don't want these to be the default options and they discourage naiive users, which is one of the reasons Linux doesn't make greater inroads into the Windows userbase.

Too many Linux users and developers revel in the inaccessibility of the system. Inaccessability is not a virtue it's a fault. 'Regular users'? Have you any idea how goddam condescending that sounds when you're the ONLY user. It's MY computer. I paid my dues in that game. I don't need some OS that tells me different. That's why tablets and phones running Android (no paragon of accessibility) are everywhere now after no time at all and Linux is nowhere after plugging away for years.

phofman 14th March 2013 10:29 PM

I had no idea naive windows users were using embedded linux on Raspberry Pi. If you do not want to learn the very basics (which permissions are) and yet want to try linux, you should have started with ubuntu on a regular x86 machine. Most likely you will get stuck soon anyways with this kind of approach to learning new stuff.

Actually I do not understand your motivation behind using linux at all if you flat refuse to learn.

tomchr 14th March 2013 10:33 PM

I would argue that a desktop PC is not the way to go from an environmental stand point. Most older PCs consume gobs of power even at idle. My old AMD Athlon PC used 40 W when off (!). "Off" meaning that I'd have to hit the power button to turn it on and watch it boot. It used over 200 W at idle and more when it was actually doing stuff.

My Mac Mini uses 40 W when running flat out, 5 W when idle, and less than 2 W in stand-by (wiggle mouse and it wakes up). My old Thinkpad T42 laptop has similar power numbers, though, its CPU is a lot less powerful than the one in my Mini.

I'm very happy with Apple Lossless files streamed through iTunes to my Airport Express. The Airport Express has optical S/PDIF out. I control iTunes through a smartphone app (Apple Remote).

I've edited enough configuration files in my life. I prefer to let others do that... I just want stuff to work.

~Tom

counter culture 14th March 2013 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phofman (Post 3411136)
I had no idea naive windows users were using embedded linux on Raspberry Pi. If you do not want to learn the very basics (which permissions are) and yet want to try linux, you should have started with ubuntu on a regular x86 machine. Most likely you will get stuck soon anyways with this kind of approach to learning new stuff.

Actually I do not understand your motivation behind using linux at all if you flat refuse to learn.

I cut my Unix teeth on Sun workstations under Solaris.

counter culture 15th March 2013 12:19 AM

The trouble with Linux is that the guys who are into it think that they're better than the common cut of humanity; and perhaps they are, but they inhibit it from becoming what it could be, a true game-changer, because they insist that the price you're gonna pay for using it is that you're going to have to learn something in the process, if only patience.


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