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Old 16th August 2010, 11:27 PM   #1
hewo is offline hewo  United States
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Default XLR Microphone into PC

1. Does anyone know how to convey the XLR (pin1=ground, pin2=non-inverted, pin3=inverted) into the PC ?

2. the intent is to obtain a digital file.

3. someone told me the PC needs a specialized application in order to generate the digital file.

4. however, the intel board D975XBX features intel's chipset i975X, intel's southbridge 82801GB (ICH7/R), smsc's LPCIO LPC47M182

5. the audio hardware intrinsic to this intel board should be able to do the conversion.

6. the microphone is an XLR output microphone. I am not certain this line level signal is appropriate for the intel board's microphone input. that's because there's two signals (non-inverted and inverted) and only one can be accepted by the PC microphone input, and, the impedance match of the microphone XLR output going into the PC's input might not be proper.

7. any suggestions recommendations are appreciated.

8. i am trying to use this PC to record vocalist tracks which eventually will be blended (mixed together).

thanks
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Old 16th August 2010, 11:47 PM   #2
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Any particular microphone? As many mics require 48V DC to be supplied by the mic pre-amp. Pin #1 is not part of the signal circuit and it is connected directly to the chassis near the XLR connector.

Radio Shack did have a adapter/transformer #274-016.
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Old 17th August 2010, 12:36 AM   #3
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I'll assume you you are looking for a free solution and post this anyway.....

CEntrance -> MicPort Pro

It would be money well spent IMHO.
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Old 17th August 2010, 02:52 AM   #4
benb is offline benb  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hewo View Post
1. Does anyone know how to convey the XLR (pin1=ground, pin2=non-inverted, pin3=inverted) into the PC ?

2. the intent is to obtain a digital file.

3. someone told me the PC needs a specialized application in order to generate the digital file.

4. however, the intel board D975XBX features intel's chipset i975X, intel's southbridge 82801GB (ICH7/R), smsc's LPCIO LPC47M182

5. the audio hardware intrinsic to this intel board should be able to do the conversion.

6. the microphone is an XLR output microphone. I am not certain this line level signal is appropriate for the intel board's microphone input. that's because there's two signals (non-inverted and inverted) and only one can be accepted by the PC microphone input, and, the impedance match of the microphone XLR output going into the PC's input might not be proper.

7. any suggestions recommendations are appreciated.

8. i am trying to use this PC to record vocalist tracks which eventually will be blended (mixed together).

thanks
I presume this is running some version of Microsoft Windows. That will handle all the interfacing between the "mic" and/or "line" inputs and whatever chip sets the PC uses, so chipsets and hardware specifics don't matter as far as getting this thing done.

There are hundreds of "specialized applications" that do this. Windows includes a small app called "sound recorder" but it is too simple and lacks features needed for even the simplest recording job. A commonly used free program is Audacity (available for Windows, Mac and Linux). It's the first two hits when you Google that name.

To point 8, the PC internal sound circuits may not have as good a sound quality as needed. You may need to buy a USB sound interface with an XLR microphone input. This will also supply the voltage needed to use a microphone that runs on phantom power.

It appears you are starting from "ground zero" as far as knowledge about audio recording on a computer. You may be better off hiring someone who is more knowledgable in this area to do the task you want.
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Old 17th August 2010, 03:52 AM   #5
cbdb is online now cbdb  Canada
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There are many types of microphones, some need phantom power (fed to the mic from the mic preamp) some run on batteries, some dont need power. The non powered ones put out a lot less level ( 20 to 40 db) so you need a quiet pre amp.

Wire the +ve xlr pin of your mic to the +ve input of the mic in and the -ve pin of the xlr to the ground of the mic input, thats it.
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Old 17th August 2010, 06:28 PM   #6
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You need to check out this site..... Home Recording

More info than you can possibly take in.
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Old 18th August 2010, 04:09 AM   #7
hewo is offline hewo  United States
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Default XLR microphone into PC

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbdb View Post
There are many types of microphones, some need phantom power (fed to the mic from the mic preamp) some run on batteries, some dont need power. The non powered ones put out a lot less level ( 20 to 40 db) so you need a quiet pre amp.

Wire the +ve xlr pin of your mic to the +ve input of the mic in and the -ve pin of the xlr to the ground of the mic input, thats it.

17August2010:
1. Thanks for all replies to this post.
2. professional vacuum tube condenser microphones are being used.
3. proprietary XLR seven pin cabling from the accompanying power supply floor box must be utilized.
4. but the box's output port is for standard three pin XLR.
5. i am still definition confused about +Ve and -Ve.
6. are you saying +Ve represents XLR pin two non-inverted and -Ve is XLR pin one ground ?
7. if, hypothetically, you are assigning -Ve to XLR pin three inverted signal, it would annihilate +Ve assigned to +Ve, thus yielding nothingness. that's because they are completely out of phase with each other.
8. please clarify on this definition +Ve and -Ve. I assume your symbol "V" represents voltage and the subscript "e" represents "exit" or "effluent", essentially signal leaving the microphone system which is used to drive the house PA, or, in this case, the two conductor input of the intel motherboard's microphone input port.
9. intel's website software package was installed for this particular intel board's onboard audio hardware. an intel application progrom beyond what is furnished default by XP Pro SP3 may be the answer, possibly, creating resolution digital files.
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Old 19th August 2010, 02:05 PM   #8
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I have done internet radio. I dont remember what mixer I had...but it had stereo out where I could hook it up it up to the mic or input in on the sound card. It had XLR input and regular 1/4 jacks. If you could find a mixer like that then you can use your XLR mic.
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Old 20th August 2010, 08:07 PM   #9
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As stated before, you need an audio interface. What software will be used? Pro Tools, Abelton, Cubase, Acid, Logic, etc.......?

Audio Interfaces | Sweetwater.com
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Old 9th September 2010, 11:40 PM   #10
Pixo is offline Pixo  India
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Here is the typical pin assignment for a 3-pin xlr audio cable:

pin 1 = ground
pin 2 = hot
pin 3 = cold

So for your purpose, connect pin 1 to ground and pin 2 to the signal lead of the left channel Line-in jack of your computer. If yours doesn't have a line-in, then use the microphone jack. But be aware that the microphone jack supplies a small amount of DC bias for regular microphones to work. This may or may not interfere with your equipment.

Keep the cable form the mic box to the computer short - that keeps noise to the minimum.

Pin 3 of the xlr connector doesn't always supply an audio signal. In most mid-end equipment, it is just used to invert the noise present in the line before summing it up at the receiver, thereby subtracting the noise, but keeping the signal at the same level.

But if yours does supply an audio signal, then you can probably connect that to the right channel of the line-in or microphone jack. Now when you do a stereo recording, you'll be recording the signals as a stereo track with both the signals being out of phase to each other.

Once you're done recording, invert one of those signals and sum both up - you should have a noise-free recording. (this assuming that you're using some recording software)
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