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Old 26th March 2004, 09:29 PM   #1
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Default 0 noise, 0 moving parts, water cooling heat pump/radiator!

Many class A lovers will thank me for this 1!

Electro-Kinetic pums are comming!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.cooligy.com/electrokinetic_pump.html

First use will be for super quiet PCs. Article:

http://www.frostytech.com/articlevie...articleID=1476

Soon, we will should be able to make a class A amp with all the mosfets squeezed into the smallest possible surface shortening all traces/wireing, OR, use minimum mosfets/transistors again in a condensed PCB while the water cooling will allow for a remote large radiator heatsink.
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Old 26th March 2004, 10:12 PM   #2
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Also don't forget, NO-EMI emissions!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 27th March 2004, 03:20 AM   #3
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I've been water cooled on my Aleph 2s for quite some time now, but that's with a pump.
Recently I replaced the heat pumps here at the house and ended up with two more heat exchangers in the process. Not exactly a silver lining to the cloud, but perhaps a lighter shade of black. I've been threatening to run tubing and try a convection system, i.e. no pump at all. Before I commit the Alephs to such a strategy, I'll experiment with resistors and see if the thing cools well. Given my current time constraints, it'll be a while before I get to try it, though.

Grey
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Old 27th March 2004, 08:36 AM   #4
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I think you miss understood, Electro-Kinetic pump is nothing more than a distilled water pump, nothing else. It's the heatsink side which does the cooling. The pump has no moving parts & if the water is really well distilled (pure H2O), the pump should run continuously for a few decades. Since it's somethin like a big capacitor & resistor in parallel, there is no worry about any inteferance signals being transmitted to the amp, like a pump motor, or fan motor. It also makes no noise like conventional pumps, or fans.
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Old 27th March 2004, 08:53 AM   #5
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Unhappy The laws of physics can't be changed...

I'm afraid we're chasing a red herring. The pump is nothing more than a mean for taking heat from one place (the MOSFETs or the output devices, in the case of a power amp) and carry it to another place - a heat exchanger of some sort, like the heatsink or a radiator.

However, in the end you're always left with the original problem you started with, that is the heat to be dissipated. Actually, I don't know how efficient this pump might be, but in any event it will generate some heat of its own, thus increasing the problem.

I don't think that the different circuit layout that this technology would allow would compensate for the added complexity of the system.

In the end, you're always stuck with the old problem: you either use a large heatsink, or you force the air to flow across an exchanger by means of of a fan (noise and em!).
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Old 27th March 2004, 10:22 AM   #6
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But thats the beauty of water cooling. A heat exchanger like Greys old AC units will likely have 20" x 40" x 2" x 10 fins per inch or 16000 in^2 of cooling surface compaired to a large heatsink having 12" x 20" x 1" x 3 fins per " or 720 in^2. And with water cooling, the pump and fan can be remotely located where the heat dicharge and noise are not an issue.

I just closed on a new house with a listening room upstairs that backs up to the attic and plan to put a car radiator and electric fans in the attic.
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Old 27th March 2004, 10:50 AM   #7
Bakmeel is offline Bakmeel  Netherlands
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I believe there is a significant detail omitted in this story. I have worked with elektrokinetic water displacement in glass chips. The effect is also known as electrophoresis, used in DNA analysis.

If you apply a high voltage to water inside a microscopic channel (around 10um wide) the water draws to the negative side. Point is: you need high voltages, around 500V per centimeter.

The pump won't introduce any EMI, 'cause we're talking DC here. But using these pumps will need adequate safety precautions. I believe these pumps will find themselves useful in long-life, high reliability and low-noise applications. Not inside my amp.

Bouke
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Old 27th March 2004, 01:55 PM   #8
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I didn't miss your point...you missed mine.
There's no pump like no pump.
A convection water cooled system would have to have a pretty decent temperature differential for it to cool well, and there are other factors to be dealt with, but there would be no pump, no noise, no EMF, no AC, no DC. Nada. And it would never wear out, nor would it need to be switched on and off.
If it works.

Grey
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Old 27th March 2004, 03:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by Bakmeel
I believe there is a significant detail omitted in this story. I have worked with elektrokinetic water displacement in glass chips. The effect is also known as electrophoresis, used in DNA analysis.

If you apply a high voltage to water inside a microscopic channel (around 10um wide) the water draws to the negative side. Point is: you need high voltages, around 500V per centimeter.

The pump won't introduce any EMI, 'cause we're talking DC here. But using these pumps will need adequate safety precautions. I believe these pumps will find themselves useful in long-life, high reliability and low-noise applications. Not inside my amp.

Bouke
Here you go, a pump specs, well, not a high flow one.
http://www.eksigent.com/pdf/EKpump_data_sheet.pdf

The first mentioned URL have the first high flow EK pumps & they only need 12v for full blast, however, they have yet to publically post any tech data.
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Old 27th March 2004, 03:56 PM   #10
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Default Re: The laws of physics can't be changed...

Quote:
Originally posted by m.parigi
However, in the end you're always left with the original problem you started with, that is the heat to be dissipated. Actually, I don't know how efficient this pump might be, but in any event it will generate some heat of its own, thus increasing the problem.
Heat of it's own? It's a prours piece of glass with an electrode on top & bottom. How does this make heat except for the small amount of friction involved? The darn thing draws a 1-5 ma at most. (The high flow one for PC heatsinks mentioned in the first post.)

Ok, granted, some heat will be made. However, we are not talking aboud a motor with it's coils, drawing half an amp of so, pluss mechanics, plus the separation between motors dry side and the input of the pump.....
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