How about the use of cpu collers of a water type. - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Pass Labs

Pass Labs This forum is dedicated to Pass Labs discussion.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 16th December 2012, 10:31 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Triodethom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Newnan GA
Smile How about the use of cpu collers of a water type.

Any thoughts on using some of the water coolers that are made for cpu they are designed to cool 125 watt cpu . Given there are fans but in a box their not that loud to me if the correct fan is chosen. What are your thoughts as to the effectiveness of this method ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2012, 10:32 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Triodethom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Newnan GA
Sorry that's Coolers
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 03:00 AM   #3
6L6 is offline 6L6  United States
diyAudio Member
 
6L6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Denver, Colorado
There are a couple guys working on that basic idea in the Pass forum, it seems like a great idea for the bigger dissipation amps.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 12:07 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Triodethom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Newnan GA
Given current price of them a classic krell box class a amp looks doable with low noise fans.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 12:11 PM   #5
freax is offline freax  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
freax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: NSW
They're called waterblocks, and they can take quite a bit of heat away, but you also need to dissipate it again, lots of noisy fans, preferably outside.

Its been done for donkeys years but I quit using it purely because of the high maintenance and risk associated with topping it up and continuiously checking it for leaks.

It is also costly, a heatsink shys in comparison to the cost of a large watercooling system including pump, waterblock, radiators, fans, twin variable power supply for fans and pump...

Would be good if you want to make a small amp, if your limited on space but also have a window nearby.

There are also passive colum radiators for watercooling setups, maybe two of them would be silent enough for you to enjoy the amp fully.
__________________
"It seems that perfection is reached not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away" - Antoine de Saint Exupéry

Last edited by freax; 17th December 2012 at 12:15 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 02:13 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Triodethom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Newnan GA
Smile Not that big So Sorry

Quote:
Originally Posted by freax View Post
They're called waterblocks, and they can take quite a bit of heat away, but you also need to dissipate it again, lots of noisy fans, preferably outside.

Its been done for donkeys years but I quit using it purely because of the high maintenance and risk associated with topping it up and continuiously checking it for leaks.

It is also costly, a heatsink shys in comparison to the cost of a large watercooling system including pump, waterblock, radiators, fans, twin variable power supply for fans and pump...

Would be good if you want to make a small amp, if your limited on space but also have a window nearby.

There are also passive colum radiators for watercooling setups, maybe two of them would be silent enough for you to enjoy the amp fully.
That full blown system is over the top from what I was thinking . 2 self contained water coolers like corsair makes as does a dozen others . Cost at about 70 dollars us . There are some very quiet fans that move a lot of air have them in my 6core and the new 8core does a great job of cooling .
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 02:16 PM   #7
freax is offline freax  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
freax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: NSW
don't me fooled into thinking that watercooling magically absorbs all of the heat and just makes it disappear, that water does evaporate and there is where your heat is going, into the air, aka a sauna.

If you need better cooling it is infinitley more efficient to simply use a very large 140-200mm fan ontop of the heatsinks, large fan = more airflow = lower speed = less noise = undervolt it if need be = silence
__________________
"It seems that perfection is reached not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away" - Antoine de Saint Exupéry

Last edited by freax; 17th December 2012 at 02:19 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 02:25 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Triodethom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Newnan GA
Quote:
Originally Posted by freax View Post
don't me fooled into thinking that watercooling magically absorbs all of the heat and just makes it disappear, that water does evaporate and there is where your heat is going, into the air, aka a sauna.

If you need better cooling it is infinitley more efficient to simply use a very large 140-200mm fan ontop of the heatsinks, large fan = more airflow = lower speed = less noise = undervolt it if need be = silence
I see the use of fans a good way of improving the heat sinks effectiveness . The water cooler I spoke of are a closed loop systems like an automotive cooling system . Your chose of fan is far simpler and very reliable . For that matter in the distant past I have built chimneys as the quietest way of increasing air speed across passive heat sinks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2012, 06:12 PM   #9
sippy is offline sippy  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
don't me fooled into thinking that watercooling magically absorbs all of the heat and just makes it disappear, that water does evaporate and there is where your heat is going, into the air, aka a sauna.
If your liquid cooled pc does this regular, you got it wrong.

Quote:
If you need better cooling it is infinitley more efficient to simply use a very large 140-200mm fan ontop of the heatsinks, large fan = more airflow = lower speed = less noise = undervolt it if need be = silence
Cougar Vortex 120mm fans run under volted, make a 'Laptop' type cool pad, fans under fins, job done with old school chunks of finned alloy.

Babysitter for Papa's Koan
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2012, 07:35 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: peak district, england
I tried using a water cooling system for a Zen V4 variant and used a hydor brushless PC cooling circulator hooked up to a small washroom radiator. It was extremely effective at removing heat from the heat sink at the back of the amp but although the pump was quiet it wasn't silent; probably noisier than cooling fans would be. Sort of defeats the object of high end audio. The other problem was that after several months the circulator would silt up with black copper oxide sludge and would stall. This caused overheating with some spectacular blow-outs.

It was a great talking point! but I eventually had to replace the cooling system with the normal massive heat sinks.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
External CPU for chipamp CJ900RR Chip Amps 5 13th July 2009 08:36 AM
Prescott instead of Northwood CPU lawbadman Everything Else 0 24th March 2006 07:12 PM
CPU cooler for amplifier Circlotron Solid State 16 27th December 2002 10:58 PM
Water cooled plate on ebay (possible water cooled amp application) BrianGT Parts 1 27th May 2002 03:19 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:11 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2