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Old 20th November 2002, 06:14 PM   #1
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Default Graphite Foam Heatsinks? Check this out.

http://216.33.240.250/cgi-bin/linkrd...fwhatis%2ehtml


This is a link to a graphite foam material that may be applicable to heatsink apps.


Tony D.
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Old 20th November 2002, 06:31 PM   #2
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uh, dead link...

MR
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Old 20th November 2002, 06:41 PM   #3
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Bad link.

Foams in general do NOT make good heatsinks compared with the solid materials. "Normal" graphite is good for refractory applications (not an issue here, we're not running at 1200 Kelvin), but its thermal conductivity and heat capacity are rather mediocre compared to metals. The exception is pyrolytic graphite parallel to the molecular planes, but the anisotropy (about 1000:1) makes it impractical as a heat sink

The best conductor is still diamond. If I can convince deBeers to send me free samples...
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Old 20th November 2002, 06:55 PM   #4
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Sorry about the link, here it is:

http://www.pocothermal.com/html/whatis.html


I am not all that familiar with these types of foams although I think this may be a new type that can be used for heatsink apps.

SY, thanks for the info., I just wish I knew what you are talking about
.

P.S., one of the apps. mentioned on the website is cooling of electronic devices.

Tony D.
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Old 20th November 2002, 07:05 PM   #5
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Well, heck, *I* wish I knew what I was talking about!
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Old 20th November 2002, 10:09 PM   #6
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Default Huh?

Hi,

Quote:
Well, heck, *I* wish I knew what I was talking about!
Yet I'm sure he does know what he's on about.
Right SY?

Tony,

Graphite isn't all that good a conductor,be that for convection or electrical.



Cheers,
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Old 20th November 2002, 11:25 PM   #7
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Believe it or not, I was in contact with PocoFoam about 4 years ago (IIRC) talking with them about this technology with regards to forced air cooling of cpus. At least back then, the cost was overwhelmingly prohibitive - like $150usd for a 3" cube of the material. They've likely gotten their production costs down some, but it's not going to replace or be any better than good 'ol aluminum any time soon.
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Old 20th November 2002, 11:41 PM   #8
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Default WEIGHT VERSUS COST

Hi,

I think their main goal is to bring the weight of these heatsinks down.

By the time they get there the industry may just as well have found a way to reduce lattice induced heat.

Oh well I whish'em good luck,
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Old 20th November 2002, 11:47 PM   #9
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I have a friend at Imperial College in London who is a metallurgist, he has a colleague who is working on this, no details at present because he is waiting for patent approval, but he has promised to get me some samples to try out.

Apparently they have a new technique that can cut the size of heatsinks by up to half, using some sort of esoteric foamed aluminium alloy, the efficiency gains being made by the doping of the ally with various other elements, and a new way of making open cell foams.
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Old 20th November 2002, 11:54 PM   #10
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Default ALLOYS

Hi,

Quote:
Apparently they have a new technique that can cut the size of heatsinks by up to half, using some sort of esoteric foamed aluminium alloy, the efficiency gains being made by the doping of the ally with various other elements, and a new way of making open cell foams.
Now that makes sense to me.
You can also get good cooling by drillig small holes at strategic place on rhe cooling fins.

Peltier elements anyone?
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