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Old 12th December 2005, 12:40 AM   #11
poobah is offline poobah  United States
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Bistable can mean a couple of things:

1. The relay has two coils... you pulse one coil to close... you pulse the other coil to open. In either case its "stable" because you dont have to maintain the coil current to maintain the circuit.

2. In another variety... you have one coil, pulse it with a positive pulse and you close... negative and you open... same deal with stability.

These are a cool thing, but as Curmudgeon rightly pointed out, ya gots to be carefull.
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Old 12th December 2005, 12:57 AM   #12
sklimek is offline sklimek  United States
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Location: Arizona badlands
Quote:
Originally posted by poobah
Bistable can mean a couple of things:

1. The relay has two coils... you pulse one coil to close... you pulse the other coil to open. In either case its "stable" because you dont have to maintain the coil current to maintain the circuit.

2. In another variety... you have one coil, pulse it with a positive pulse and you close... negative and you open... same deal with stability.

These are a cool thing, but as Curmudgeon rightly pointed out, ya gots to be carefull.
Thanks, found this after your post, got it now.

"A bistable relay is one, which has two unpowered states which it toggles between. Unlike typical "astable" relays, where power must be applied continuously for the working contact to close, this bistable action allows that power only be applied momentarily, to change the state of a latching "see-saw" mechanism, making continuous power consumption and heating unnecessary".

Looks like these things might actually work...

Stan
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Old 29th October 2012, 06:23 PM   #13
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I am thinking about building a 4 to 1 turntable switcher. Switched voltage is .004 to .050 volts. Reason for using Mercury Wetted Relays is that with such a tiny switched voltage, a regular contact switch will corrode & become unstable. The relays will be manually switched in/out. So fast switching is not necessary.

I will probably do dual input pwr. sup (AC & DC). But if the AC pwr sup causes hum, I'll ditch it & use an outboard DC "wall wart" power supply.

Any thoughts on using Mercury Wetted Relays for this purpose?

MLStrand56
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