Resistor Sound Quality? - Page 5 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Parts

Parts Where to get, and how to make the best bits. PCB's, caps, transformers, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 30th October 2005, 01:48 PM   #41
henkel is offline henkel  Malaysia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
I tried the Kiwame resistors as I proceed to further mod my NAD PP-2 phono stage.

The Kiwames are indeed sweeter on the 'top end' but theres a small trade off compared to the TKDs. The latter sounds lifelier overall and better pace.

So I ended up with the Kiwames in the input stage and the TKDs at the output gain stage.

A combo that I find fits my liking.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st November 2005, 07:37 PM   #42
klitgt is offline klitgt  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
klitgt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Denmark
Quote:
Originally posted by ElectricHead

Old carbon types: Slow, muddy, dull, lifeless, missing treble, loosy bass, missing space & 3D. Hissy with high distortion factor. I will never understand the people using this crapp. [/B]

"Old carbon types" is too inaccurate. Please specify which brands you allude to. AB are metioned several times here as the best resistors for audio, cc or any other type
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st November 2005, 10:36 PM   #43
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Let's say all carbon types except Riken.

Many people building nasty sounding amps, afterwards they trim it with lush and colored sounding paper-in-oil caps and rotten hissy distorted drifted carbon resistors to make it listenable or they just don't want reality but a nice 'sound'.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2005, 01:56 AM   #44
diyAudio Member
 
serengetiplains's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Canada
Quote:
Originally posted by ElectricHead
... rotten hissy distorted drifted carbon resistors ...
Nice description!

Vishays are best IME. By the way, a wonderful small American company called Texas Components (website here) makes Vishay resistors on licence with Vishay. TC also manufactures a unique de-encapsulated Vishay version---called "nude"---especially for audio (we're the only weirdos who would use such a wonderful thing). I deal with Arbie at TC, and they sell to we who order as little as one resistor. What a deal.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2005, 08:47 PM   #45
chrisr is offline chrisr  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: n/a
if you can hear the differance between two resistors, well lets just say your credibility just went out the window with me. am i right so say the differances are so small that no one including golden ears could hear it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2005, 09:07 PM   #46
Luke is offline Luke  New Zealand
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Wellington NZ
Send a message via AIM to Luke
Quote:
if you can hear the differance between two resistors, well lets just say your credibility just went out the window with me. am i right so say the differances are so small that no one including golden ears could hear it.

Hi Chrisr,

I know what you mean and thought like you, but I did take the time to try and see for myself so as I could dismiss it based on firsthand experience. Just build a gainclone with no frills resistors and spend some money at partsconnection on ridiculously priced rikens or caddocks and see for yourself.
Considering people spend thousands on cable its probably not too over the top spending a hundred or so on resisitors? Guess its a personal descision.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2005, 09:46 PM   #47
diyAudio Member
 
analog_sa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Sofia
Quote:
if you can hear the differance between two resistors, well lets just say your credibility just went out the window with me.


Surely you meant 'if you can't hear...'
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd November 2005, 10:43 PM   #48
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
I tried Vishays S102 many times, but somehow I was not excited about their sound. Not that I couldn't hear them, they were rather boring, lacking livelyness. The nude Vishays seem to sound brighter. None of them is good for I/V stage and here Caddocks TF020 or Rikens performed much better. So Vishays, IMO, are not really the best.

I can get them for $2 and still prefer to pay $6 for Caddocks.
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2005, 03:00 AM   #49
diyAudio Member
 
sagarverma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NEW DELHI
Quote:
if you can hear the differance between two resistors, well lets just say your credibility just went out the window with me.
errrr excuse me please.carbons r really bad.metal films really sound better(reasons::::1)carbons have thermal noise.
l 2)resistance error high,bad tolerance
3)as someone mentioned out here,they absorb
moisture over time and this affects their
behaviour seroiusly



make an amp that will reproduce every audible hz that u throw at it and hear the difference in sound between the resistors.
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd November 2005, 04:00 AM   #50
chrisr is offline chrisr  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: n/a
i actually tried listening to the differance years ago during the building of a simple single mosfet preamp. nothing really special as they were just radio shack 1/4 watt carbons vs. radio shack 1% 1/4 watt metal-films and i could hear no differance.

i refer to this comment by thylantyr:

This is what I've noticed in the world of electronics.

People are young and start here ->

*Do you circuit design, listen.
*You change the circuit design because it was designed poorly.
*Sound improved.

The same people get older and start here ->

*Your circuit design skill are better and you make good stuff.
*Now you venture in the world of esoteric mods to make it better.
*You claim it does but offer no scientific study to confirm.

You grow old and start here ->
*Your circuit design skill are better and you make good stuff.
*Now you continue with esoteric mods to make it better.
*You now wonder if these mods are really audible or is it just
placebo ?


Younger folks who do mods seem to think that they can beat
the engineering team behind large corporations as if they
don't know what they are doing.

_____________________________

i think that comment is worth a million bucks, althou some better parts WILL make a differance in sound i firmly belive that the secret to good sound lies in the design. at some point you have to accept that your getting diminishing returns especially when it comes to the higher priced parts that to me airn't justifyed for the role they play.

if you can make a better design thats great. but if your building a amp for me i'll gladly take the metal-films but the ones that cost $0.25 cents each and not the $6 ones. thats my take on it.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Quality Control differences = variations in sound quality? KT Class D 3 4th June 2014 12:02 AM
Signal path Resistor Quality rtate Solid State 121 28th November 2008 07:48 PM
Resistor Sound - How is this possible??? fmak Parts 81 24th August 2003 12:38 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:48 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2