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Old 27th July 2005, 02:14 AM   #1
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Default Solid state switching of signals

What would be the cleanest way to switch an AC signal path on and off using solid state?

The signal is only low, a few volts, and since it's a signal I can't really make do with diode voltage drops, which immediately points towards bias / trigger devices where the only drop is from their internal resistance.

I'd prefer not to have to use solid state relays since they're kind of expensive and I need lots of them, nore do I absolutely need their isolation potential.
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Old 27th July 2005, 06:20 AM   #2
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For low power signal I (and many others) use this way (T14 and T15 in the attached circuit)

There are other ways, but this is nice and clean

- By the way.... This is from the QUAD 34 preamp
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Old 27th July 2005, 07:17 AM   #3
mzzj is offline mzzj  Finland
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Default Re: Solid state switching of signals

Quote:
Originally posted by eeka chu
What would be the cleanest way to switch an AC signal path on and off using solid state?

The signal is only low, a few volts, and since it's a signal I can't really make do with diode voltage drops, which immediately points towards bias / trigger devices where the only drop is from their internal resistance.

I'd prefer not to have to use solid state relays since they're kind of expensive and I need lots of them, nore do I absolutely need their isolation potential.

HC4066 and similar cmos swiches are classically used for things like these. VHC4066 is tad better in on-resistance and maxim-ic for example has improved versions that are still pin compatible with 4066. 4066 on-resistance is variable and varying with signal strengt, somewhere between 50-500ohms so your input impedance after switch has to be enough high.
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Old 27th July 2005, 04:28 PM   #4
Leolabs is offline Leolabs  Malaysia
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U can try JFET too.Harmon Kardon and NAD do use them in their amplifiers.
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Old 31st July 2005, 11:59 AM   #5
Vidalgo is offline Vidalgo  Israel
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For low-current signals, try this way:
Click the image to open in full size.
No signal distortion introduced.
Switches W1-W3 - any bidirectional type: solid state, relay contacts, etc.
Control: only one switch open at a time.
Need to high-impedance load, or opamp input.

Cheers.
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