Removing Plastic covers from Capacitors - Page 24 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Parts

Parts Where to get, and how to make the best bits. PCB's, caps, transformers, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th January 2003, 11:46 PM   #231
diyAudio Member
 
mrfeedback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Perth, Australia.
"I wonder how it effects the sound. One could try pvc, and other metals for the capacitor, with rigorous effort."

I read somewhere recently that only aluminium can be used for the can.
I suppose other metals could be used if the can were insulated perfectly.

Eric.
__________________
I believe not to believe in any fixed belief system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th January 2003, 12:54 AM   #232
www.audiohobby.com
diyAudio Member
 
Michael Rothacher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Blog Entries: 5
I blast mine with a coat of copper spraypaint!
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th January 2003, 02:29 AM   #233
jcarr is offline jcarr  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Back in the early 1980s, Nippon Chemicon (IIRC) had some plastic-case electrolytics that sounded quite nice - at least by the standards of the day. NEC (IIRC) also had some glass-encapsulated tantalum capacitors that were considerably better-sounding than other tantalum caps. These were, however, removed from the marketplace due to accelerated leakage and other durability issues.

Also, I feel that the reasons why non-conductive case capacitors sound good and the reasons why removing the plastic covers from aluminum-can electrolytics sound good are completely different.

Regards, jonathan carr
__________________
http://www.lyraconnoisseur.com/, http://www.lyraaudio.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th January 2003, 10:57 AM   #234
diyAudio Member
 
mrfeedback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Perth, Australia.
Quote:
Originally posted by jcarr
Back in the early 1980s, Nippon Chemicon (IIRC) had some plastic-case electrolytics that sounded quite nice - at least by the standards of the day. NEC (IIRC) also had some glass-encapsulated tantalum capacitors that were considerably better-sounding than other tantalum caps. These were, however, removed from the marketplace due to accelerated leakage and other durability issues.

Also, I feel that the reasons why non-conductive case capacitors sound good and the reasons why removing the plastic covers from aluminum-can electrolytics sound good are completely different.

Regards, jonathan carr
Jonathon, thanks for reminding me of plastic encapsulated electrolytics - I had forgotten all about them, and at the time I did not critique them sonically.
Never heard of glass encapsulation tantalums - I expect that they would sound unusually good - pity about the reliability issues - maybe this is solvable nowadays.
I agree that capacitor cans material and plastic labels are different issues.
I think that the reason for no non-aluminium cans is to do with reactions with the electrolyte, and non reactive material (plastic, glass ok, wood ?) are ok in this respect.
I find interactive field effects by proximity of materials affecting sonics.
In the case of the plastic shrink wrapping of electrolytics, I reckon from 10 years ago 'caps skinning' experience, that the sonic changes are due to removal of firstly the tension of the plastic, and when the plastic is removed, another sonic change.
Cutting the plastic sleeve removes tension and alters microphonics, and removal of the plastic sleeve gives another sonics change ime.

Eric.
__________________
I believe not to believe in any fixed belief system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th March 2015, 01:24 AM   #235
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Angry Totally F**ked-Up My CD Player!!!

Took all the plastic covers off the Capacitors and wound-up with a non-functioning Sony CD Player!!! Tossed it in the garbage!!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th March 2015, 04:14 AM   #236
JMFahey is offline JMFahey  Argentina
diyAudio Member
 
JMFahey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Buenos Aires - Argentina
Did you expect otherwise?

You deserve it for following nonsense threads.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th March 2015, 04:41 AM   #237
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boulder Creek, CA
Electrolytic caps usually have some DC leakage on the case. If you remove the plastic then you can short out various things if you touch the naked electrolytic cap to something conductive or another cap. So, when experimenting with naked caps you need to be careful or you can fry something. The fact that caps sound different when naked is a fact you can hear. Whether you like the effect....well, that is another story.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th March 2015, 02:31 PM   #238
DF96 is offline DF96  England
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
The main reason for the plastic is insulation. Remove that and you increase the risk if damaging the equipment through shorts.

A secondary reason is to damp mechanical resonances. Encourage those and the sound may change, but not for the better.

As we often say, it is easy to make things sound different. It is hard to make competently-engineered items sound better.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th March 2015, 05:15 PM   #239
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boulder Creek, CA
There are many ways to damp a capacitor: .....constrained layer damping material, silk, cotton, wood, cardboard, Marigo dots, etc. Also there are WA Quantum chips......these make a serious improvement. There are no "perfectly engineered products that have no sonic signature". Everything sounds different. Every brand and type of cap has a sonic signature. The "game" is to find the best parts and use them in the best way to create a sonic masterpiece (incredible information retrieval with incredible musicality....ie..super low audible noise and distortion). Since most things that can be heard cannot be measured.....well, it makes for a grand task that is never over.
  Reply With Quote
Old 14th March 2015, 05:31 PM   #240
DF96 is offline DF96  England
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Was that a competition entry for the thread post which pushes the most 'audiophile' buttons while using the least words?

Taking the last point: the truth is that many things can be measured but not heard, but everything which can genuinely be heard can be measured. For a small minority of such things it may be that we haven't yet worked out exactly how to measure it.

Unusual sensitivity to component details is a sign of poor circuit design. This is most likely to be found in very cheap, very expensive or very DIY items.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TO-3 Covers genther Parts 2 20th July 2008 05:52 PM
transformer covers space-cake Parts 7 28th March 2008 08:57 PM
How do you get the covers off Acoustat Rapidroy Multi-Way 3 16th January 2008 07:59 PM
Speaker Covers flchibear Multi-Way 0 18th June 2007 05:41 AM
IMF cm 2 front covers ? itsme1 Multi-Way 0 25th November 2005 07:43 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:56 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2015 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2015 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2