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still4given 22nd February 2005 09:12 PM

I want to buy an Oscilloscope
 
I'm at the point where I want to learn how to use a scope. Will something like this work for what I need?

Do I need more Mhz? I don't know anything about them. I just want to get something I can use for working on my projects and to learn on.

Thanks, Terry

Netlist 22nd February 2005 09:20 PM

Re: I want to buy an Oscilloscope
 
Quote:

Originally posted by still4given

Do I need more Mhz?

For normal audio measuring, this is plenty. I have a 15 year old 35Mhz and still happy with his bandwidth.
Looks like a neat instrument you found there.

/Hugo :)

Hornlover 22nd February 2005 10:46 PM

This scope will work great, if you get it for a reasonable price. Most likely, it will be bid up past reasonable, from an audio point of view. If your projects center around audio applications, then a 20MHz unit is more than enough. You can get them new from about 300 up. You probably want to look for a dual trace, so you can monitor both the input and the output of the DUT.

rcavictim 22nd February 2005 10:59 PM

Terry,

That scope on ebay is a beauty and way overkill for audio only work. If you are on a budget I have seen suitable dual trace scopes for as low as $20 on ebay. All you need is 10 MHz. If you are not experienced with electronics stay away from the large vintage Tektronix 500 series models like the 565. They will be difficult for you to keep running as they contain about 565 tubes. On the other hand, if what you need is a 500 watt fan forced air electric space heater for your shop, grab one!

SY 22nd February 2005 11:01 PM

Mmmmm, beg to differ. I'd look for 100MHz or better so you can spot RF oscillations. 10MHz is enough for audio, sure, but many problems in audio are the result of Bad Things happening at RF.

acenovelty 22nd February 2005 11:48 PM

Terry and others,
Check out our gov't surplus at:

http://www.govliquidation.com/list/c7234/lna/32.html

for instance.

Prosit

mlloyd1 23rd February 2005 12:05 AM

I agree with Sy. I guess I would take 60MHz if you held a gun to my head and made me do it, but I'd recommend 100MHz min. Dual trace is a MUST. I also have to admit at my old age, scope measuring cursors are handy now, too.

Hitachi used to sell a decent 100MHz scope with measuring cursors some years ago that was pretty decent - easy to use, worked well and durable. I know because I still have mine. :-) They show on ebay every once in a while a good prices - benefit of NOT being named Tektronix :-)

On the occasions when they do, MOSFET source followers oscillate at a high frequency. Need a good scope or you might not see it or know what it is. Ask me how I know :-(

mlloyd1

Mmmmm, beg to differ. I'd look for 100MHz or better so you can spot RF oscillations. 10MHz is enough for audio, sure, but many problems in audio are the result of Bad Things happening at RF. [/QUOTE]

mercator 23rd February 2005 12:47 AM

Good luck with your scope shopping Terry.
When you do get one, here is a good resource for learning how to use it:

tektronix abc's

/Dave

jackinnj 23rd February 2005 01:10 AM

Re: I want to buy an Oscilloscope
 
Quote:

Originally posted by still4given
I'm at the point where I want to learn how to use a scope. Will something like this work for what I need?

Do I need more Mhz? I don't know anything about them. I just want to get something I can use for working on my projects and to learn on.

Thanks, Terry

Scopes are so inexpensive these days -- if you are going to remain in Audio I think you might find the Tektronix 7700s to be a great purchase -- provided you aren't limited to space -- there is an enormous number of amplifiers and time-bases available for these devices, you can use the 7L5 spectrum analyser, there's an excellent low noise differential amplifier (the 7A22N), etc., etc.

Some of the older scopes are better for testing out power supplies -- and these (like the Tektronix 535) are often given away at hamfests. The trace on these older scopes can be much sharper and brighter than a DSO --

I use both a Tek 2465 and a TDS3014. While I like the 2465 a lot if I had the space I would probably go back to one of the ancient analog models.

rcavictim 23rd February 2005 02:41 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by SY
Mmmmm, beg to differ. I'd look for 100MHz or better so you can spot RF oscillations. 10MHz is enough for audio, sure, but many problems in audio are the result of Bad Things happening at RF.

When I started out I bought a vintage (even then) scope from RCA that used a thyratron tube to develop the H. sweep. I'd be surprised if the bandwidth exceeded 500 KHz. Somehow it was useful enough to teach me more about electronics, the oscillators I was breadboarding at the time using 6SN7 tubes, and some of the tube audio amp work I was doing at age 13. Like I have done all my life, I didn't start out with a Cadillac because I needed a car, I did the best I could with the best I could obtain. Slightly later in my mid teens I built an o-scope from scratch. That project, not following any plans, just basic schematics in the RCA tube manual didn't hurt my self teaching a bit.

I don't disagree with what Sy has said about higher bandwidth being helpful in spotting birdies, but the poster Terry did not specify what projects and clearly said he wanted merely a starter scope to learn on. Man if I'd had a 10 MHz dual trace scope starting out I'd have been even more dangerous.

Yeah sure it is possible to learn how to drive on a Cadillac I guess. Rip around on yer daddy's muddy cornfield with it. :D

Me thinks a lot of you guys sure are spoiled!


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