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Old 15th August 2004, 11:27 AM   #11
Did it Himself
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At a guess, soaking the paper for the 'transparancy' in oil makes it go translucent. Then wipe clean with kitchen paper.

Sounds a bit messy to me, but good luck if it works for you.
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Old 15th August 2004, 12:08 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by ashok
Hi OliverD,
That write up with pics was very nice.
But I couldn't understand what you did with the vegetable oil and your reference to " making the print transparent ".



Looks like you missed out that because everyone ( except me ?) knows what is to be done.

I have the prints , the clean board and the veggi oil. What next?
I know the step after that , remove excess veggi oil ( with soap ?). So does one apply the oil to the board ?
The next one would be etching.
Sorry for being dumb.
Thanks,
Ashok.
I know it's more expensive than making the paper translucent -- but consider using Avery "Full Page" transparent labels -- these stick right on the photo-resist and are easily to align under "red" illumination. I found that using mylar (or paper) results are difficult to obtain since the mask often does not align 100%
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Old 17th August 2004, 09:24 AM   #13
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I just use a DeskJet printer with HP standard inkjet transparancies. Print using best quality and have never had a problem even with very thin tracks. They are fairly expensive I suppose, but I put several designs on one sheet to maximise usage, and it's worth paying for the fact that I get perfect results everytime.
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Old 17th August 2004, 10:43 AM   #14
OliverD is offline OliverD  Germany
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A good inkjet printer with high quality transparancies works best.

However at home, I only have laser printers. So I had to find another way...
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Old 18th August 2004, 12:49 PM   #15
alecwek is offline alecwek  Denmark
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why do u people use pcbs....is it because they are easier to poulate than then normal bredboards, bacause you used a computer to design ur stuff.......maybe some other reason...or simply because it looks damn good????
cause right now i only use bredboards at about 1pound70 per 15cm*10cm board...or whatever length t is....are pcbs that much more expensive......how much per board after buying all the other expensive gear ...like the uv box...thats gotta be a *****...huh!??.....
sorry to hijack your thread...
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Old 18th August 2004, 01:19 PM   #16
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OliverD, great post.

I hope you don't mind me adding a few comments:

Regarding the transparancies: they exist for both inkjet and laser; I've used both with those two types of printers and had very good results.

I also use the same mix as you for the etchant (in fact, I've posted it around here somewhere...), and I've been using it on my diy projects for a long time. But I would not use hot water.

There are developers specifically designed to develop photoresist (see RS, for example). Having worked with both, I can say that a developer, although more expensive, is better than NaOH+H2O because it is less "agressive". With the developer you can leave the board more time in the tub while you wait for all parts of the photoresist to come off. With the NaOH+H2O, if you leave it a bit too much it will remove both the exposed and unexposed bits.

Also, for those that prefer to use photoresist spray instead of pre-sensibilized pcbs, here's my own two cents: the key to a perfect pcb is to dry the photoresist in a perfectly horizontal surface, so it doesn't flow to one side making the layer uneven. If you can, use an hoven at 65deg.celcius for half-hour; thats the best way to do it. That is better than leaving it to dry in room temp because in that case the photoresist will have a longer time to be able to flow before becoming too dry to do so and will almost certainly pick up dust particles. The advange of the spray is that it is cheaper if you're doing more than a few and if you mess up the developing of the pcb you can go back and sensibilize it again. If it's a one-time issue then pre-sensibilized is better, but then I'd say ordering it done might be even better.

J.Guilherme
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Old 18th August 2004, 07:00 PM   #17
OliverD is offline OliverD  Germany
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Hi J.Guilherme,

I tried transparancies for laser printers, but my HP Laserjet 4 plus simply doesn't produce enough toner density - even with all settings maxed and a brand-new cartridge. Always have to use two layers...

I also use photoresist spray and I'm getting very good results. A dust-free environment and an oven is essential, though.
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Old 18th August 2004, 07:57 PM   #18
Johnix is offline Johnix  France
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This is what I got using a laser printer on transparency film with max contrast and full darkness :

Click the image to open in full size.


A zoom on tiny tracks - board completed :

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 18th August 2004, 09:13 PM   #19
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For anyone that etches their own boards as I have many times you will find the etching time greatly reduced if the board is floated copper down in the etchant. When done in this fashion the copper that is being dissolved will fall away from the board to the bottom of the tray due to its weight. This way the bare copper always has fresh full-strength etchant working away at it. Using this method with feric chloride etchant I've been able to cut the average etching time in half. But this should work just as good with any etching solution.

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Old 1st September 2004, 01:27 AM   #20
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Default even easier

I tried this and it worked quite well: 200 mL of 3% hydrogen peroxide (the pharmacy grade) and 100 mL of 31.5% hydrochloric acid -- aka "Muriatic Acid" . Use once and throw away with plenty of water -- and I mean plenty of water !!!

the Muriatic Acid "fumes" so it's best mixed outdoors.
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