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Miniature electrolytic capacitors shootout - Best for Coupling to Headphones?
Miniature electrolytic capacitors shootout - Best for Coupling to Headphones?
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Old 17th March 2018, 07:14 PM   #61
jean-paul is offline jean-paul  Netherlands
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No-one tried the Wima MKS2-XL in 22 uF (or any other large value) ? I recall them being quite OK in parallel with Nichicon MUSE bipolars. Since I stock them I use them wherever I can in analog.
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Old 17th March 2018, 07:30 PM   #62
mjf is offline mjf  Austria
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i think in real live amps we open a window to unwanted "submusic" signals
if we use those big elcaps......(transformer regulation, dc-regulation,.......other sub sonic events or sowhat).

(aside that, a psychological effekt: some people feel sick when they receive subsonic events - it remembers them on earthquakes........)
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Old 17th March 2018, 08:11 PM   #63
cbdb is offline cbdb  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anti View Post
I don't have a slightest clue or an explanation to what exactly is causing that (soakage?). Having said that, I found that even 4700uF-into-32 Ohm various consumer cans gives that "bloated" feel. Even with 3300uF (cca 1.5Hz corner or so). 2200uF is passable (cca 2Hz) ... but to me it depends on the cap brand. As you noted, some are better than others (IME low-ESR "industrial" types).

With 50/64 Ohm both I liked the 1500uF best (1,9Hz and 1,6Hz corner, but with a 50mm driver).

Actual experience IME goes a little against the math.
Then your experience is wrong.
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Old 17th March 2018, 09:35 PM   #64
anti is offline anti  Slovakia
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How do you know?
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Old 24th March 2018, 07:44 PM   #65
cbdb is offline cbdb  Canada
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Because the math is right.
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Old 25th March 2018, 11:45 AM   #66
anti is offline anti  Slovakia
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Caps contain chemicals. Chemicals override the math. Probably because the math dosent factor in the chemicals.

Or the ifluence of the weather. How's the weather on the other side? Here's a little cloudy but not so bad after all ...
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