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Old 28th March 2004, 01:34 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jocko Homo
I prefer stand-aone gear. I can take it where I need it, without having to lug a computer.

Not familiar with that model, but I have had troubles with a Tek mainframe/analyser combo at my last job. Could have been a fluke, but it spent more time at Tek than my lab.

Jocko
Was it a FLUKE or a TEK?

Quote:
Originally posted by BrianL
There is a BIG difference between your two choices, fmak.

The Tek is a swept analyzer. The PC soundcard mit software
will be an FFT analyzer.

The two are not necessarily interchangable. Each has pros
and cons.

The Tek stuff can be flakey and IMO they never really figured
out how to make a spectrum analyzer, modular or one-piece.
But for $220...

If you're only wanting audio, look for an HP3580A.
Brian, saying that TEK never figured out how to make a spectrum analyzer somehow doesn't compute with the fact that they sell several million dollars worth every year and are the gold standard in certain TV, cable RF applications. We could find fault with Agilent, Anritsu, Rohde, Fluke etc. if we had the time.

The truth of the matter with respect to the 5L4N is that it isn't an easy instrument to adjust if it gets out of alignment. Don't bother with the 5L4N unless you get a manual and get some shots of the thing actually working. As with a lot of TEK scopes, there are several proprietary chips which are impossible to replace. The 5113 mainframe is pretty durable, has a big screen and is dirt cheap. There are a good number of plug-in's for the 5XXX series including the 5A22N which has 10uV/cm sensitivity. Bandwidth is limited. These instruments were mainly used in automotive vibration analysis and medical applications. The 5L4N shown below works fine, but took about an entire day to align (and I had to make an alignment jig!)

FWIW, I use an FFT analyzer for power supplies and a "wave analyzer" hooked up to a chart recorder for audio.
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Old 29th March 2004, 03:58 AM   #12
BrianL is offline BrianL  United States
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Jack,

I'm glad that Tek makes nice TV monitor/repair equipment.
But if you check, you'll find that most of that is from the
Grass Valley Group which they bought.

Tek's spectrum analyzers (not specialized TV equipment)
were never much to write home about. Talk to anyone that's
been in this business a while and you'll find that they'll
take an HP/Agilent spectrum analyzer over Tek any day.
Quite the opposite with oscilloscopes; there people
have generally preferred Tek.

If you haven't noticed, Tek threw in the towel and now
have an "alliance" with Rohde and sell their analyzers.
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bel
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Old 29th March 2004, 04:25 AM   #13
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Quote:
But if you check, you'll find that most of that is from the
Grass Valley Group which they bought.
Well, no, not quite. Grass Valley started out making video cross bar matrix switches (aka routing switchers). They dabbled in synchronization generators, but that never really caught on. The ones that the Mother Ship were making were just too good.

While not the same as the esteemed company of Mr. H and Mr. P., Tek has a long a venerable history as a maker of lab grade test equipment.

http://intel.com/community/oregon/hi.../tektronix.htm

HP dabbled in the broadcast instrument buis for a while, but not much came of that either.

I was always partial to the 494 P spectrum analyzer (DC to 24 gig w/out the external mixer). But then my life was always kind of broadcast centric. Yah, lots of lab rats cant life w/out their HP. Like must stuff, I guess it depends on what your measuring and what you grew up with to determine the best tool for the technician.

After flirting with Sony for over a decade, Tek up and sold the GVG off to Thompson a couple of years ago.

-Dave

PS:

http://www.ncerc.org/articles/LA_times_0599.pdf

Quote:
In 1954, Charles Litton sold most of his Bay Area company - which later became LittonIndustries - and moved the rest to an abandoned hospital building in Grass Valley, near his favorite weekend retreat.

Five years later, he was joined by former classmate Donald Hare, a gifted engineer who had taught Bill Hewlett and David Packard at Stanford.

Hare founded Grass Valley Group, whose control boards, switches and routers led a revolution in television effects, enabling split-screen views and graphics used in everything from the evening news to Super Bowl broadcasts.

Hare's company, which he later sold to Tektronix, triggered a high-tech boomlet, spawning spinoffs and start-ups that turned the area into a video technology hub and a major supplier to Hollywood.
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Old 29th March 2004, 04:46 AM   #14
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Pardon my digression.

So, fmak,

What are you looking to measure and for what purpose? Knowing that, it is likely that you can get more specific adivise.

-Dave
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Old 29th March 2004, 06:18 AM   #15
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So, fmak,

What are you looking to measure and for what purpose? Knowing that, it is likely that you can get more specific adivise.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thanks. For audio use. If it covers rf, then it is a bonus.

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Old 29th March 2004, 02:25 PM   #16
DRC is offline DRC  United Kingdom
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My 2c, FFT is better, especially for audio. Only the practicalities of making a sufficiently fast A-D convertor with enought memory / computational speed limit the FFT technique.
Dave.
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Old 31st March 2004, 07:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by DRC
My 2c, FFT is better, especially for audio. Only the practicalities of making a sufficiently fast A-D convertor with enought memory / computational speed limit the FFT technique.
Dave.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Does anyone have experience of the WinAudioMLSPro? Price seems reasonable and operataion straight forward. Doesn't say that it will handle 24 bit though.
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Old 11th April 2004, 12:43 PM   #18
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Default Re: Which Spectrum Analyser??

Quote:
Originally posted by fmak
What is the better spectrum analyser to have?

A Tek 5L4N on a 5113 mainframe with a dynamic range of 80dB for $220

or

A software package such as SpectraPlus 132 for $300 or more with plug ins.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
I finally resolved my dilema and decided against another 10 kg instrument.

Found the dr-jordan-design WinMLSPro package on ebay for $25 and upgraded to 24/192 with 64 bit FFT.

Works nicely; an instrument with high dynamic range and zero additional weight!
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Old 9th May 2004, 12:25 AM   #19
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Default RE: measurement

I started to use Lynx L22 (only two channels, but available sometimes on ebay for less then $500, very important part for ANY measurements is the stable clock, plus not-notch ADC AK5394) and free RMAA software. 80dB range is absolutely not acceptable for me, as I need to measure levels of noises and distortions close to -100dB ...
Tried WinMLSpro and ETF5, they good for measuring of the impulse response and plots, but not as flexible in common as RMAA is.
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Old 9th May 2004, 01:41 AM   #20
JonPike is offline JonPike  United States
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If budget is a issue (and how often is it not?) look at the M-Audio Revolution 7.1 card. You can find it for under $100 if you look around, and it's pretty much as good as the Audiophile 2496 (used to be $250, now findable for $150 or so)

If budget is really an issue, don't worry about what they say about SB cards.. they basically work, and not badly if you run them in their native 16bit 48Khz mode so they don't resample. Also go to the RMAA site to read how to disable internal loopback modes that sometime create lousy performance.

Audigy 1 has pretty low noise (what I have), and the Audigy 2 ZX is actually a pretty good card for a change.. though you are getting close in price to the Revo 7.1, which is much better.

Also, the gaming and DSP stuff should not make any difference, barring having the already mentioned loopback paths under some situations.
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