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Old 29th August 2015, 11:17 PM   #1
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Default My father's parts drawer

I have been cleaning out my father's old parts from his many years of electronics projects. I ran across some transistors that I would like to learn more about and find out if they are useful for anyone.

At the very least, their history looks interesting, although I haven't found anything much online. These transistors were originally supplied to GM as engineering samples in the mid-1960's. With most of them from the "Delco Radio" division, others from Solitron and Bendix Semiconductors, they were supplied to AC Spark Plug for uses unknown. It is interesting to see them in their original boxes, complete with test data and mica insulators.

The searching that I did online suggested that Delco was mainly into Germanium transistors into the early 60's, but who know what they were doing by the mid-60's. The Delco parts were clearly sourced from the Delco plant in Kokomo, Indiana.

If anyone has information on these, I'd love knowing more. If by some weird chance they are still useful, even better. I know I won't use them.

Jac
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg 5E312 A.jpg (565.9 KB, 238 views)
File Type: jpg 5E312 transistor sheet.jpg (560.0 KB, 232 views)
File Type: jpg 5E56.jpg (552.2 KB, 231 views)
File Type: jpg 5E56 transistor sheet.jpg (486.6 KB, 229 views)
File Type: jpg E327 A.jpg (555.7 KB, 94 views)
File Type: jpg E327 base.jpg (427.1 KB, 91 views)
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Old 30th August 2015, 01:20 AM   #2
evette is offline evette  Canada
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Hello SXir,,From what I recall delco made the first pl909 transistors in late 60,s also they made the first group of high voltage transistors such as the DTS 410 series to the dts420 series I don,t recall when they stopped producing transistors..
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Old 30th August 2015, 01:47 AM   #3
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The AC Spark Plug connection and the high Veb ratings suggests that they may have been experimenting with electronic ignition systems.

Last edited by Bibliophile; 30th August 2015 at 01:54 AM.
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Old 30th August 2015, 01:53 AM   #4
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They may have "numismatic value" for a collector.

FWIW, Audio Research used Delco HV transistors in the regulator of the SP-3 preamplifier.
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Old 30th August 2015, 12:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bibliophile View Post
The AC Spark Plug connection and the high Veb ratings suggests that they may have been experimenting with electronic ignition systems.
I agree. It must be something like that. I also have a set of unmarked transistors that have a notation "Hc leak test". AC was involved in emissions controls so electronic ignition and exhaust emission control seem likely.

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Originally Posted by jackinnj View Post
They may have "numismatic value" for a collector.

FWIW, Audio Research used Delco HV transistors in the regulator of the SP-3 preamplifier.
That's interesting. The Audio Research connection shows audio people were looking cross industry in those days too.

I don't care about monetary value, but I would like them to go to someone who is interested in them. Any suggestions on how to find a collector who would value them?
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Old 30th August 2015, 02:16 PM   #6
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I will ask one of my friends who's a car-nut. Perhaps the American Radio Relay League in Newton CT would know.
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Old 1st September 2015, 11:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackinnj View Post
Perhaps the American Radio Relay League in Newton CT would know.
Jack,

Thanks for the suggestion. The ARRL has a historical collection, including discrete components like transistors. They are happy to get them. I think that is a great home for them.

Jac
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Old 2nd September 2015, 01:48 AM   #8
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What a nice thing to do. Your dad would be proud.

Peace,
Tom E
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Old 2nd September 2015, 07:46 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lehmanhill View Post
I have been cleaning out my father's old parts from his many years of electronics projects. I ran across some transistors that I would like to learn more about and find out if they are useful for anyone.

At the very least, their history looks interesting, although I haven't found anything much online. These transistors were originally supplied to GM as engineering samples in the mid-1960's. With most of them from the "Delco Radio" division, others from Solitron and Bendix Semiconductors, they were supplied to AC Spark Plug for uses unknown. It is interesting to see them in their original boxes, complete with test data and mica insulators.

The searching that I did online suggested that Delco was mainly into Germanium transistors into the early 60's, but who know what they were doing by the mid-60's. The Delco parts were clearly sourced from the Delco plant in Kokomo, Indiana.

If anyone has information on these, I'd love knowing more. If by some weird chance they are still useful, even better. I know I won't use them.
In the 1960s the first major application for power transistors in cars was electronic ignition. Replacing and adjusting the existing electrical contact point components cut deeply into the reliability of cars.

Germanium was the first material of choice for early transistors because it worked and it could be fabricated more easily and at lower temperatures. This same advantage became a disadvantage when reliability suffered at high ambient temperatures.
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Old 2nd September 2015, 08:25 AM   #10
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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Delco germanium TO3s were used elsewhere in electronics though. I saw them specified on schematics and used in the amps from Seeberg jukeboxes and some Rockolas.
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