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-   -   What's a fuseable resistor? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/parts/228019-whats-fuseable-resistor.html)

maylar 17th January 2013 01:16 PM

What's a fuseable resistor?
 
A friend of mine needs to replace a resistor in his printer (not audio, sorry) that's listed as a "fuseable" resistor. In the fuse module there are 2 resistors, a 100K maybe 1/4 watt and this fuseable 56 ohm thing that looks to be a standard metal film part:

http://www.maxim-x.com/stuff/samsung...use_module.jpg

I can't find anything in Mouser or DigiKey that references fuseable resistors, so I'm wondering what's special about it and what's the best replacement item. He says the part is open circuit, so obviously it does act as a "fuse".

Thing is, I've seen metal film resistors catch fire when overloaded so I'm really at a loss here.

madtecchy 17th January 2013 01:34 PM

It is not a metal film resistor. Most common place i found these fuseable or saftey resistors was within CRT Televisions ... Used to buy mine from a place called wiltsgrove electronics in birmingham

oz7aff 17th January 2013 01:35 PM

Fusible resistors is exactly what the name says, a resistor that act as a fuse. They was very often used in tube type monitors, in the high voltage supply.
You should be able to find them searcing for fusible resistor og fuseable resistor.

madtecchy 17th January 2013 01:38 PM

They can be found here Electronic Components | Electronic Parts | Farnell United Kingdom

Enzo 17th January 2013 02:16 PM

I'd take the advice oz7aff gave - do your search for "fusible" resistors. I just plugged that into Mouser and it came back with a bunch. A place to start anyway.

maylar 17th January 2013 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Enzo (Post 3329966)
I'd take the advice oz7aff gave - do your search for "fusible" resistors. I just plugged that into Mouser and it came back with a bunch. A place to start anyway.

Thanks a bunch. Silly me.. a spelling error.

sreten 17th January 2013 08:51 PM

Hi,

I'd say its a part guaranteed to go open circuit if overloaded, and
guaranteed to able to interrupt certain voltages and currents.

I'd guess its possible melting resistors could go lower in value
and short, rather than go open, but I've never seen it, all
fried resistors I've come across have been open circuit.

Perhaps an extra section that melts at a given power.

rgds, sreten.


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