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Old 21st November 2012, 10:00 PM   #11
AJT is offline AJT  Philippines
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i was told by a friend that there was this guy who lost in a power cable shootout and so will replace 8 pieces of power cables with ones costing about U$3000 each.....man, he must be filthy rich....
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Old 23rd November 2012, 12:13 PM   #12
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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Crazy! But if he can afford and it makes him feel good, a bit different from my world. Me though I get a set of $5 dollar leads and spend the other few thousand on a few CD's a party and a one way ticket to mars for the missis...
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Old 14th May 2015, 11:43 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xjr100 View Post
.... Teflon insulated, pure silver solid AWG18 hook-up.
Hi really a gauge that big is needed ? is that high the current flowing through the wires in a tube amp to need AWG18 ?
honestly asking. I have no clue.
Thanks, gino
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Old 14th May 2015, 11:52 AM   #14
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Maybe the heaters, and the speaker output. In both cases the issue is not current flow (causing wire heating) but voltage drop. Everything else can use thinner wire.
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Old 14th May 2015, 11:56 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrenkin View Post
I would use something similar to what ever wire is in your output transformers and the rest of your amp. Probably is standard smaller gauge copper and there is an awful lot of it, so I can't imagine that a few feet of anything else would matter. If you sprung for fancy silver transformers, spring for the silver hookup wire too.
Hi this answer makes a huge sense to me.
Thanks for the advice.
I wonder which AWG wire use normally in output transformers.
I would be very curious to know.
And i think there are many feet of wire in the windings ...

Moreover ... what about speaker cables (sorry for the OT) with a gauge ten times the one of the woofer coil ? if not more ?
is not that overkill ?

Thanks a lot for the very valuable advice. It made me think.
Kind regards, gino

Last edited by ginetto61; 14th May 2015 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 14th May 2015, 12:06 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
Maybe the heaters, and the speaker output. In both cases the issue is not current flow (causing wire heating) but voltage drop. Everything else can use thinner wire
Hi and thanks and perfect ! i understand better now.
But i have liked the advice to look at the gauge of the output transformers windings ... this is a very good advice.
I do not know how long is a winding ... but some meters more they will have a very little effect i guess.
Now i just wonder which gauge they normally use ... found this

Valve Amps: Output transformers

Quote:
... In the example tranny the primary has 2,000 turns of thin wire, whereas the secondary has 90 turns of thick wire....
They say "thin" ... how thin is not specified ...
I start to understand why someone use magnet wires as hook-up wires.
Thanks again, gino

Last edited by ginetto61; 14th May 2015 at 12:18 PM.
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Old 15th May 2015, 09:19 AM   #17
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ginetto61
I start to understand why someone use magnet wires as hook-up wires.
Not a good idea. 'Magnet wire' (we call it enamelled copper wire in the UK) is unsuitable for hook-up as it has poor insulation - too fragile to maintain good isolation, yet often too thick to allow easy soldering. Hence you have to remove the enamel at the ends and add extra insulation. Why not simply use hook-up wire instead?

Each piece of wire in a system has different requirements and different constraints. This means that within a particular circuit loop you won't necessarily use the same wire everywhere. For example, the speaker circuit has a number of wires:
- OPT secondary
- amp internal wiring
- speaker cables
- crossover inductors
- speaker internal wiring
- voice coil
Some are constrained by total size occupied (e.g. OPT sec, voice coil, inductor). Some are constrained by flexibility (speaker cable) and terminations (e.g. must fit under terminals). Some can be partly mitigated by negative feedback (e.g. OPT sec). So each is chosen for its particular task and place in the system. Don't just blindly make them all the same size!
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Old 16th May 2015, 06:32 AM   #18
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Hi and thanks for the very helpful advice
I was clearly wrong. One question. Do you prefer stranded or solid core hook-up wires ?
I think this is the main and basic decision. If one type is better than the others this should reflect also in interconnects selection.
Thanks again a lot, gino
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Old 16th May 2015, 09:49 AM   #19
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Solid when I want it to stay where I put it. Stranded when I want some flexibility. Either when I don't care if it moves or not. All interconnects needs to be flexible, so all interconnects are stranded.
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Old 16th May 2015, 11:20 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
Solid when I want it to stay where I put it. Stranded when I want some flexibility. Either when I don't care if it moves or not.
All interconnects needs to be flexible, so all interconnects are stranded.
Thanks a lot again for the very helpful reply.
I understand you do not believe to that "inter-strand interaction/distortion" the people who prefer solid core/litz often mention.
They say (dont know it this is true) that in a conductor the signal tends to travel on the surface of the wire. So in stranded wire with the surfaces of each wire in contact this can create distortion effects ...
I am not a scientist ... but i have to say that i twisted some magnet wires to make an interconnect ... that sounded particular. More clear mids ?
Different sound compared to normal stranded ICs.
Maybe i was just doing a really bad cable with high F and inductance.
Thanks a lot again, gino
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