diagram for DIY component tester-tracker - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Parts

Parts Where to get, and how to make the best bits. PCB's, caps, transformers, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 30th October 2003, 10:51 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: GTA
Default diagram for DIY component tester-tracker

I remember seeing some diagrams for homemade huntron tracker
type devices using one's scope
I can't find the links and don't remember the principles of operation

anyone?

EDIT:
heres what Huntron will tell us

Tracker Signature Analysis

The Tracker works by applying a current-limited AC signal across two points of a component. The current flow causes a vertical deflection of the CRT trace, while the applied voltage causes a horizontal deflection. Together they form a unique V/I signature that represents the overall health of the device under test. Analyzing the signature can quickly determine whether the component is good, bad, or marginal.
__________________
intentionally blank
  Reply With Quote
Old 4th November 2003, 09:49 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
djmiddelkoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Noord-Holland
It is quite simple.

Take for example a transformer with a 6V secondary winding.
Connect one wire to the X or Horizontal input of your scope and also to a probe of some kind.
Now take the other transformer wire and connect it to a resistor, for example 1kohm, and connect it also to the Y or vertical input of your scope.
The other end of the resistor goes to the ground of your scope input and to another probe of some kind.
Set up your scope so that the horizontal sweep is not enabled, but external input is used.
Also adjust Hor and Ver sensitivity for correct size.

The Huntron tracker works on the same basics as described above, but also with other frequencies and sensitivities.
The last one can be easily done by changing the 1kohm resitor to other values.

good luck,

Dick.
__________________
“Information is not knowledge.Knowledge is not wisdom.
Wisdom is not truth.Truth is not beauty.Beauty is not love.Love is not music.Music is THE BEST.”
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th November 2003, 03:53 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: GTA
Thanks Dick,
also found for some reason people call these things an "octopus"

I have settled on using my signal generator for a source and a few hundred ohms across the horizontal inputs (scope probe 10x)

I can then see the effects of different frequencies and gain like the huntron

found I could also use my cheapie LEADER curve tracer but it only
displays one polarity at a time nd I would need to switch constantly
__________________
intentionally blank
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd January 2008, 06:50 AM   #4
saj888 is offline saj888  Trinidad and Tobago
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Default Component tester

Hi,
Im a technician from the Caribbean. Im thinking about buying a BK component tester. Would it really make a big difference in troubshooting. I sometimes have as much as 20 power amps to repair in one week.
What would AK techs recommend to repair power amps more efficiently and faster.
I presently use a scope, audio generator, variac, multimeter, dummy loads.
I have never seen any book that teaches advanced pro audio troubleshooting. Most of the troubleshooting books just have basic run of the mill troubleshooting. Nothing unique and advanced.
Anyone can remove every part in a set and test them with a multimeter.
Does anyone know of any modern troubleshooting techniques.
Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th January 2008, 04:12 AM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
djmiddelkoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Noord-Holland
I'm used to using the Huntron for all the repair work I do and couldn't do without it anymore.
With it, it is easy to find what is wrong without applying power.
Of course experience is a must.
I guess experience, knowledge and self taught troubleshooting is the technique. With the latter depending on your instruments.
I don't know of any modern techniques, if any.
__________________
“Information is not knowledge.Knowledge is not wisdom.
Wisdom is not truth.Truth is not beauty.Beauty is not love.Love is not music.Music is THE BEST.”
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th January 2008, 03:27 PM   #6
gootee is offline gootee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Indiana
Blog Entries: 1
The only thing I can think of that's better is when you also have an identical working unit, to compare with. Then a "tracker"-type intrument (i.e. current vs voltage x-y scope display) can be used to compare the I-V "signatures" at identical circuit points, in the bad and good units.

A simple I-V x-y display circuit is at http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_semitest.html#stqdc , which is part of Sam Goldwasser's excellent "electronic repair" website.

My ready-made one is here: http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/gooteect.htm . If you want to add base/gate staircase capability to a simple I-V display circuit, like that one has, you can just use a 4-bit binary counter IC and have it count from 0 to 16 (or whatever), one step for each sweep. A simple R-2R ladder works well for a digital to analog converter, for the outputs. Add an opamp buffer/amp, and an attenuator, and it's good to go. In my case, I added a voltage-controlled current source, a Howland type, basically an opamp with a small power amp inside the feedback loops, and also made it able to switch to voltage steps, and calibrated both with a step attenuator, and added a switchable inverting stage to have dual polarities. So now it can also display "families of curves" for transistors.

Another useful thing to do, that can save you some time, is to check the ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance) of electrolytic capacitors. If you don't have an ESR meter, you could use a scope and a square wave generator, as described here: http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/esrscope.htm . It might be worth also trying to add a DC offset capability.
__________________
The electrolytic capacitors ARE the signal path: http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/zoom3a_33kuF.jpg
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th January 2008, 12:56 AM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
djmiddelkoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Noord-Holland
Thanks for the usefull information, Tom.

Quote:
The only thing I can think of that's better is when you also have an identical working unit, to compare with. Then a "tracker"-type intrument (i.e. current vs voltage x-y scope display) can be used to compare the I-V "signatures" at identical circuit points, in the bad and good units.
Yes, this helps alot, but is not the case in many repair jobs where there is no second good unit available.
Here is where the experience helps, as you can often find the same bogey component failing, like electrolytic capacitors, heat dissipating components, drivers, etc.
The ESR meter, as described, looks very interesting and is a good alternative for the Tracker.
__________________
“Information is not knowledge.Knowledge is not wisdom.
Wisdom is not truth.Truth is not beauty.Beauty is not love.Love is not music.Music is THE BEST.”
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th January 2008, 01:32 AM   #8
saj888 is offline saj888  Trinidad and Tobago
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Default Advanced amp troubleshooting

IN most cases only one channel is defective, you could use the working ch as a reference. or there is more than one amp of the same type in the shop. You could also make notes of the readings of a good or new amp.
I have, a very long time ago. began to develop my own method of troubleshooting, simply because I could never find a book that teaches advanced techniques. Another thing I want to try is a NON CONTACT INFRARED THERMOMETER LASER TEMPERATURE tester.
I could use this to check the temperature of a component. Something like a magic wand. Just scanning the components. Would that be a dream come true. You just pass a 'magic wand' over a circuit and find the defective components.
Let me know what you guys think.
Knowledge is power.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th January 2008, 05:25 AM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Australia
I have a photocopy of an article for a passive component tester from January 1996 Elektor Electronics magazine. It wasn't very clear but if you are interested I can scan it and email it to you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th January 2008, 06:59 AM   #10
gootee is offline gootee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Indiana
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally posted by djmiddelkoop
Thanks for the usefull information, Tom.


Yes, this helps alot, but is not the case in many repair jobs where there is no second good unit available.
Here is where the experience helps, as you can often find the same bogey component failing, like electrolytic capacitors, heat dissipating components, drivers, etc.
The ESR meter, as described, looks very interesting and is a good alternative for the Tracker.
Too true. But it was handy when I used to buy and resell military surplus test equipment. One time, for example, I bought qty 35 Tektronix 475 oscilloscopes, and used the comparison technique A LOT. Even in that type of situation, though, experience still trumps everything else.
__________________
The electrolytic capacitors ARE the signal path: http://www.fullnet.com/~tomg/zoom3a_33kuF.jpg
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Issues with Emu tracker and THD measurements Stefanoo Solid State 165 4th May 2012 01:20 AM
Capacitor tester Bicycleguy Equipment & Tools 0 18th November 2006 12:26 AM
Have you seen this tester? smak Tubes / Valves 30 28th January 2006 06:43 PM
The GainClone Tracker WIKI - Add Your Project lgreen Chip Amps 3 8th June 2005 10:47 PM
uC DAC tester? emuman100 Digital Source 40 23rd July 2004 04:08 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:09 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2