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Old 26th October 2003, 01:27 AM   #21
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Hi,

Quote:
The A-P method is what Frank was referring to, but I now wonder if this reallly necessary if the leads are both on one end.
Psst...think it through one more time, please.

Just don't fool yourself, the only difficult part is SE...

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Old 26th October 2003, 01:52 AM   #22
Variac is offline Variac  United States
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That makes two of you
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Old 26th October 2003, 01:54 AM   #23
tom1356 is offline tom1356  United States
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I think There may be some confusion here.
The process:
I wound un-insulated silver wire onto the dowel leaving a small space in-between each wind, in one direction. Then I enameled the wire on the dowel, letting it dry. This wire now became insulated. I then wound a second layer of un-insulated wire in the opposite direction in-between the first layer's windings crossing the first layer each turn in an Ayrton-Perry wind (thanks Frank!). I then enameled that to insulate it.
Then I connected the two windings at each end.
This is why they look like crap. If I had insulated wire they would be nice looking.
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Old 26th October 2003, 01:57 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by tom1356
I think There may be some confusion here.
The process:
I wound un-insulated silver wire onto the dowel leaving a small space in-between each wind, in one direction. Then I enameled the wire on the dowel, letting it dry. This wire now became insulated. I then wound a second layer of un-insulated wire in the opposite direction in-between the first layer's windings crossing the first layer each turn in an Ayrton-Perry wind (thanks Frank!). I then enameled that to insulate it.
Then I connected the two windings at each end.
This is why they look like crap. If I had insulated wire they would be nice looking.
Thanks for the clarification.

What'd you use for the enameling?

se
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Old 26th October 2003, 02:00 AM   #25
tom1356 is offline tom1356  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Steve Eddy


Thanks for the clarification.

What'd you use for the enameling?

se

Nail polish.
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Old 26th October 2003, 02:08 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally posted by tom1356
Nail polish.
Hehehe. Resourceful.

se
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Old 26th October 2003, 02:08 AM   #27
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Hi,

Quote:
What'd you use for the enameling?
In general X to the square of Pf to the tef of lon squared to Z?

I think I'll ask Jam for the cartoons...

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Old 26th October 2003, 02:13 PM   #28
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Default so here's the question,

If it really does make an audible difference, one would need to establish why yes?

The old "silver sounds better" thing I think will not get us any closer to understanding audio electronics. This is an electrical component, thus the electrical properties at audio frequencies are what will make an audible difference.

In installing these new resistors what have you changed?

Resistive material
size of the resistor
physical configuration (which will affect parasitic capacitance and inductance among other things)
distance of the new resistor from crossover and loudspeaker components
signal path length

If this crossover is inside the speaker cabinet you have also changed the internal volume of the box.

So out of all this, how does one get to blame the silver for all the change? Each of what I mentioned above will have some effect. But until you know how much, you are just shooting in the dark. Have you taken a look at the new vs old crossover on a scope?

This seems to be a lot of work for a crossover resistor so if it does make an improvement, the abiltity to create as good a change for less money and effort would be a bonus. Perhaps all you need to do is buy some bifilar wound resistors and you will get all the benefits. Perhaps not.

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Old 26th October 2003, 04:40 PM   #29
tom1356 is offline tom1356  United States
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Default Re: so here's the question,

Quote:
Originally posted by Christopher
If it really does make an audible difference, one would need to establish why yes?

The old "silver sounds better" thing I think will not get us any closer to understanding audio electronics. This is an electrical component, thus the electrical properties at audio frequencies are what will make an audible difference.

In installing these new resistors what have you changed?

Resistive material
size of the resistor
physical configuration (which will affect parasitic capacitance and inductance among other things)
distance of the new resistor from crossover and loudspeaker components
signal path length

If this crossover is inside the speaker cabinet you have also changed the internal volume of the box.

So out of all this, how does one get to blame the silver for all the change? Each of what I mentioned above will have some effect. But until you know how much, you are just shooting in the dark. Have you taken a look at the new vs old crossover on a scope?

This seems to be a lot of work for a crossover resistor so if it does make an improvement, the abiltity to create as good a change for less money and effort would be a bonus. Perhaps all you need to do is buy some bifilar wound resistors and you will get all the benefits. Perhaps not.

Chris

These are outboard crossovers.
The position on the hard wired Maple crossover board is the same as the old one, the size is much bigger.
They replaced RCN ww resistors.
I don't have a scope, I listen to the system instead.
It was a lot of work, but I have never spent three hours working on my stereo that was more beneficial.
I don't know why they sound as good as they do. They have no right to. They are so simple and so ugly.
I will be replacing as many resistors as possible with silver ones.
I don't expect the same improvement as the first ones but I do expect an improvement.

Why don't you give it a try.
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Old 26th October 2003, 11:47 PM   #30
SimontY is offline SimontY  United Kingdom
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Congratulations on those resistors!

I'd like to try 'em in my speakers. My tweeter attenuation resistor is only 1ohm, so it's a nice candidate.

However, looking at Audiocom's price list for silver wire, I realise it would cost an absolute bloody fortune to make one! Their stuff is: "Long-grain Pure Silver Wire (5N) 99.997%" - maybe a little fancy for the job? I tried this in an interconnect and the sound was thin and harsh, if detailed (not the same as a resistor though!).
http://www.audiocominternational.com...silverwire.asp

How on earth was your silver wire so cheap?!?!?

Is the copper alternative in the same ballpark sq-wise? I have little silver elsewhere in the audio-chain, so I'm not super keen to use it if copper will be excellent too. Maybe some 'ordinary' enamelled copper wire would do a good job..?

One more thing: when you say gauge, do you mean AWG or SWG?


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-Simon
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