Help with identifying some caps and their values on a phono preamp - Page 2 - diyAudio
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Old 2nd October 2003, 04:57 PM   #11
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
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These types of caps are really ancient. Is there any reason to choose them?

They have one further disadvantage, they are heat sensitive, they melts very easy! Can they take wave soldering?

BTW: I have a plastic bag full with many values and sizes.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 05:03 PM   #12
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Default I heard the same Fred

I heard thats true, that Bayer the film makers for PS has stopped production again.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 05:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by peranders
These types of caps are really ancient. Is there any reason to choose them?

They have one further disadvantage, they are heat sensitive, they melts very easy! Can they take wave soldering?

BTW: I have a plastic bag full with many values and sizes.
You should give them away to someone you are not fond of. They are not practical for you it sounds like, and would be an extreme pain to use.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 05:23 PM   #14
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
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I noticed the heat thing when I soldered my old RIAA amp which had 70 um (2 oz.) copper. The caps just melted down for nothing.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 05:58 PM   #15
jcarr is offline jcarr  United States
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Peter:

>the phono stage looks very nice too (the way it's put together)<

Really? The worksmanship on your own designs is _much_ nicer than on this one.

rgds, jonathan carr
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Old 2nd October 2003, 06:19 PM   #16
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The whole point is that the way it's done doesn't require any workmanship at all. Simplicity at it's best. Just wonder how this type of assembly relates to the sound? It looks like wood case is milled out of one block. No brackets, standoffs or screws, just hot glue.
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Old 2nd October 2003, 06:40 PM   #17
jcarr is offline jcarr  United States
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>Simplicity at it's best.<

From a production engineering standpoint, I don't think so. When I don't want any worksmanship to be involved, I use an automated pcb assembly facility (pick-and-place machines, cream solder, ovens, wave soldering), and pcbs designed for the task. Eliminating the possibility of human error usually helps reliablity, and the outcome will look a lot neater and nicer than the photos that were posted.

And when I want to use human worksmanship, I want it done well, with a craftsmans' sense of pride in the quality of the results.

regards, jonathan carr
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Old 2nd October 2003, 06:48 PM   #18
Geoff is offline Geoff  United Kingdom
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Default Re: Dig that crazy glue.....Man....

Quote:
Originally posted by Fred Dieckmann
I don't believe polystyrene caps are made much anymore due to there poor resistance to many solvents. .................. For those who still think they are commonly available go try to buy a bunch of new (not surplus) 4700 pF PS caps.
Fred

Polystyrene capacitors, in values up to 10nF, are still being made by LCR and are readily available here in the UK, in small or large quantities, at the likes of CPC, RS Components and Farnell.

They also appear to be available in the US, see:

http://www.lcr-inc.com/capacitors_electronics.htm

Geoff
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Old 2nd October 2003, 07:17 PM   #19
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Hi Jonathan,

I'm still far away from having access to such facilities, so my main interest is not in PCBs, but in the ways to put things together nicely, without using much effort.

The Grado unit strikes me as such. Having the wood block milled out to a required shape, and then painted inside to eliminate RF interference, makes it a nice starting point for a chassis. It's probably better than metal chassis, as wood affects electrical circuits less than metal (sonically, or at least in a different way). If the type of wood is chosen properly, it can even make a nice contribution to the final sound.

I also suspect that it's not coincidence that the board is not attached to the wood by screws and usual standoffs but it's done by using hot glue (I suspect). Also the output coupling caps make a nice coupling point to the wooden box (although this may cause picking the vibrations from the box).

Additionally the bottom metal cover, adds some mass and stability. I am still impressed by the engineering choices made in constraction of this little wonder, and I definitely use some of them to inspire my future projects (the cheap ones at least ).

Any idea how it performs?
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Old 2nd October 2003, 07:32 PM   #20
Electrons are yellow and more is better!
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What is the price of the amp?

The opamp, anyone who knows?
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