Need help identifying a metal oxide varistor - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Parts

Parts Where to get, and how to make the best bits. PCB's, caps, transformers, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 17th February 2012, 09:15 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Default Need help identifying a metal oxide varistor

It says
TVR 330
It is 6mm dia.
Please tell me everything you know.
Where to get a replacement or equivalent?
Thanks
Click the image to open in full size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th February 2012, 09:36 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
indianajo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jeffersonville, Indiana USA
There is a series of varistors placed across the inputs of AC power equipment that is marked with the AC voltage they are expected to be safe at. They take spikes from the power line. If this connects to the AC power input of your device and it could have been powered by 240 VAC in Asia, bingo. Everybody has got these. They are also sold by the diameter, with 7mm being the standard cheapo version that can't suppress much of a strike. You can find these blue things near the input of any dead PCAT switcher power supply. One source is Tyco Raychem, at Mouser. Componies I know that make red ones are Cantherm and Littlefuse. I don't have a datasheet on this part number.
If it is in series with an AC or DC input, it might be a resettable fuse. The datasheets for the red ones I have are resettable fuses.
__________________
Dynakit ST70, ST120, PAS2,Hammond H182(2 ea),H112,A100,10-82TC,Peavey CS800S,1.3K, SP2-XT's, T-300 HF Proj's, Steinway console, Herald RA88a mixer, Wurlitzer 4500, 4300
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th February 2012, 10:10 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Maybe you find help at http://www.te.com/en/products/circui...e-devices.html
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2012, 05:42 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
indianajo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jeffersonville, Indiana USA
Yeah, TE connectivity is the new name of raychem and AMP I think. They are **** bent on destroying their old brand names for some reason. They sold off the AMP logo to an energy drink, but I don't understand why no references to Raychem anymore. Tyco was the name just last year, even though the CEO was convicted of fraud. Doesn't mean the products were fraudulent, not as bad as Sunbeam anyway. I've been getting good TE products lately from both AMP and raychem.
__________________
Dynakit ST70, ST120, PAS2,Hammond H182(2 ea),H112,A100,10-82TC,Peavey CS800S,1.3K, SP2-XT's, T-300 HF Proj's, Steinway console, Herald RA88a mixer, Wurlitzer 4500, 4300
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2012, 07:19 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
dchisholm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: St Louis, Mo
Take a look at the "Metal Oxide Varistor" data sheet found at < http://www.thinking.com.tw/documents/en-TVR.pdf >. If the dimensions match their type number TVR05330, or TVR07330, I'd bet you have identified the part. In theory, you could increase your confidence by setting up a variable DC supply with a current limiting resistor and making a crude measurement of the clamping voltage - but the thing is rated for only a few milliwatts! (Probably intended to swallow spikes on a signal line, rather than protect a power supply.)

Dale
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2012, 07:40 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
indianajo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jeffersonville, Indiana USA
The ones across the AC input of PCAT power supplies are also 7 mm. Wimpy, like everything else in that $30 product. I've been salvaging 15 mm MOS supressors from dead 460 VAC motor drives marked "500". they have an S with two slashes through it to designate spike suppressor, by contrast with this product. I figure the transformers on my audio equipment will take 600V spikes, but above that I'd like to sacrifice a little junk metal oxide. We have a lot lightning here, as proved by many dead PC components. Lightning is somewhat suppressed by the blower on the furnace or Air conditioner, but sometimes the motors are off. Then I have installed MOS spike supressors on the AC input of my amp & preamp.
Interesting a lot of people with "energy efficient" furnaces come in to maintenance with a blown up electronic controller after a big storm. Not much to do with a blown microprocessor circuit but buy another one. My old obsolete Honeywell bi-metallic thermostat furnace controller is much more suited for this environment.
__________________
Dynakit ST70, ST120, PAS2,Hammond H182(2 ea),H112,A100,10-82TC,Peavey CS800S,1.3K, SP2-XT's, T-300 HF Proj's, Steinway console, Herald RA88a mixer, Wurlitzer 4500, 4300

Last edited by indianajo; 18th February 2012 at 07:46 PM.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Resistors, metal film or metal oxide? gil1 Solid State 2 14th November 2010 02:16 PM
Metal Oxide resistors in Oz GK Solid State 8 18th June 2009 10:10 PM
Metal Oxide Screen Stoppers SpreadSpectrum Tubes / Valves 33 12th February 2009 11:49 PM
Metal Oxide vs flamme proof vs metal film ostie01 Parts 28 26th June 2006 06:38 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:12 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2