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Old 2nd August 2003, 11:49 AM   #1
sss is offline sss  Israel
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Default layout transfering

i'm interested in mking pcb's at home , not the photographic way
so.....
i got a pcb layout made with proteus lite software and one sided board
how can i transfer the layout to the board without drawing it
by hand ,is there a way to do that ?
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Old 2nd August 2003, 01:28 PM   #2
SY is offline SY  United States
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Normally, I just give the file to a PC house and they do it. Otherwise, there are some transfer materials that use a photocopier and an iron. I think it's called Tek Film or something like that. I haven't used them myself, but people I know who have are pretty satisfied.

If you buy a board with photosensitive material, you can print the pattern on a piece of clear film, then expose and develop the board according to the instructions.
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Old 2nd August 2003, 03:52 PM   #3
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The thermal transfer method is tricky.....I tried it a few times without success
I prefer printing out the circuit on acetate and buying a presensitised board

Cheers!!The DIRT®
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Old 2nd August 2003, 04:40 PM   #4
sss is offline sss  Israel
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i also tried to draw the schematic with a special marker called
Brite-Mark and the board came out messy .
is it possible to draw it with a regular marker ?
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Old 4th August 2003, 11:50 PM   #5
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I have good results with Press-n-Peel from www.techniks.com
You will need a laserprinter and an iron.
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Old 5th August 2003, 01:12 AM   #6
sam9 is offline sam9  United States
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This is from my own experience:

The iron-on method seems to work for some people quite well but others such as myself have found it to be a wast of time and money (one usable board out of four tries). I'm only guessing, but the choice of iron may make a difference. The latest high-tech, tecflon coaded micro-controlled ones were of no use to me. The ones that worked somewhat were the the old fashioned kind like your granny had.

For drawing a resist pen is required. Regular markers don't resist the etchant sufficiently (or at all). One approag is to tape the patteren to the blank PCB and using a punch make a "ding" where each whole goes. Then draw in the traces free hand. Ugly but works well for simpler layouts. It makes copperfill a no brainer if you want/need that. Sucess depand on you drawing skill which doesn't need to be great.

Although a photo-etch process sounds like the hardest, I found it the easiest and most reliable. I recomend presensitized posative prosess PCBs. Dataek sells some through www.partsexpress.com and www.jameco.com that do not require UV but just a redular 100W bulb. If you find after etching that the traces have a thin or swiss cheesy look you just need to reduce the exposure time by a minute or two. I found this to be the case with a brand new bulb. The chemicals are not all that nasty, just wear gloves old cloths and goggles. Rember Ferric Chloride leaves a really nasty stain so use it only where you don't mind leaving a small mess behind.
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Old 5th August 2003, 02:44 AM   #7
jleaman is offline jleaman  Belgium
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I have use this stuff from www.techniks.com and it worked awesome all you need to do is print out a few samples on normal paper and see the layout and see if it has errors. one problem i did have was if the pressure and heat was not applied properly your screwed. also HAIr a single stan of hair will wreck a trace so yeah be careful of hair : O )
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Old 5th August 2003, 02:52 AM   #8
jleaman is offline jleaman  Belgium
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See this link of my Experience.




http://h24-69-72-2.ca.shawcable.net/...umName=etching
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Old 6th August 2003, 02:54 AM   #9
sam9 is offline sam9  United States
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If you can make the iron stuff work, use it. It's less messy by any measure. For those of use that just can't get it right, at least there are other means.
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Old 6th August 2003, 06:44 AM   #10
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I have discovered a decal sheet called lazertran that I now swear by. You just print off whatever you want, and take it to your local copy house and use a photo copier to transfer it to the decal sheet. You can also print off in color on an inkjet and use a color photo copier for awesome color decals. Then, soak it in water, slide it off the paper backing and on to your surface it dries nice and hard. At this point, if you want a durable surface, you bake it on and it gets incredibly hard and stays clear. For stuff like pcbs where you want the actual decal material gone to leave just the laser toner, you soak it in turpentine, which takes the clear coat off but leaves the black pads and lines. The beauty of it is that theres no ironing and peeling off the backing, so your image is transferred perfectly. Throw it in your favorite etchant, and its pro quality (I will soon be using a chemical called cupric chloride, which is looking very promising, as it can be refreshed unlike ferric chloride and the other common ones). One warning, don't try running it through an hp laserjet or any printer with a fusing temperature above 200 degrees C. The clear decal part fuses to everything inside the printer. Dont ask how I know. Its 20 dollars plus shipping for 10 sheets, which may seem like a lot, but its much less than buying presensitized boards and you can also make killer front panel decals for preamps and such. Good luck.

-Chris
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