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Old 6th February 2011, 05:15 PM   #11
Raj1 is offline Raj1  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrfeedback View Post
Not sure what you mean by this ?.
Two saying subjectively less bass and conflict of opinions in mids and highs ?

Eric.

Eric,

The Welwyns are specially trimmed metal film resistors - they sound clean across the audible range and are supposed to exhibit a better SNR ratio when used in the signal path. How is this in conflict with the sound I described of the tantalums, that you've quoted above?

Last edited by Raj1; 6th February 2011 at 05:17 PM.
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Old 6th February 2011, 06:57 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by commstech View Post
I compared the AudioNote tantalum to Riken carbon in the cathode bias in my 5687 tube linestage. the tants has a more sense of air around the high notes where the carbons sounded fuller and rounded. the tants give the impression of cleaner lines between the mids and highs, but a tad softer in the bass department where the carbons fare better with firmer and richer bottoms. at the end of the tests, i decided that the tants are sounding too 'hi-fi' and the carbons remained in the circuit.

This description is very close to my experience. Shinkoh are marginally better sounding than Audio Note and non-magnetic but the general sound is very similar. Apparently the tantalums Raj1 has used are very different.
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Old 6th February 2011, 07:52 PM   #13
Raj1 is offline Raj1  United Kingdom
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Originally Posted by analog_sa View Post
This description is very close to my experience. Shinkoh are marginally better sounding than Audio Note and non-magnetic but the general sound is very similar. Apparently the tantalums Raj1 has used are very different.
Not necessarily, that's a comparison of tantalum types to carbon (which are known for being very warm and muddy) - the tants are less warm than carbons but are definitely warmer than metal film types.
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Old 6th February 2011, 08:17 PM   #14
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Well, you also have a point, although the Rikens are not your average carbon films and certainly not nearly as coloured as per example Kiwame.
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Old 6th February 2011, 08:22 PM   #15
Raj1 is offline Raj1  United Kingdom
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Are the Rikens more neutral~analytical than precision metal film resistors?
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Old 6th February 2011, 08:33 PM   #16
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Certainly not.
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Old 6th February 2011, 08:37 PM   #17
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Default from Borbely Audio (now retired)

"We have been experimenting with a number of different type resistors and found the non-magnetic Shinkoh Tantalum resistors to solve some of the problems mentioned. They
sound less dry than the metalfilms and they do not emphasize any particular frequency range. They sound more natural, more musical. They work equally well in semiconductor
and tube amplifiers. Most of the customers, who tried the tantalums, say that they would never go back to the common metalfilm type resistors.

Having said that, some also said that the tantalums sound too “nice”, with less control in bass and a touch less “presence” in the midrange. Further experiments with resistors led us
to the Caddock MK-132, which are also non-magnetic. These are also metalfilm resistors, but they do not exhibit the typical “metallic” character of the metalfilms. They sound
very clean with good dynamics, focus and a very good control of bass. Unfortunately, they are very expensive. Although you can build a whole amplifier with only Caddocks
(which we do in our top-of-the line custom made amps!), it is not necessary. To take advantage of their unique sonic qualities it is usually enough to put Caddocks in the input
stage and the feedback network. A combination of Tantalums and Caddocks gives the best result in most amplifiers.

Unfortunately, the Shinkoh tantalum resistors are no longer manufactured, and although we still have a sizable stock, they will disappear when this stock is exhausted. We are
looking for resistors that can replace the tantalums."


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Old 9th February 2011, 03:28 PM   #18
Telstar is offline Telstar  Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raj1 View Post
The Welwyns are specially trimmed metal film resistors - they sound clean across the audible range and are supposed to exhibit a better SNR ratio when used in the signal path.
Which series of Welwyn do you use?
I cant find laser-trimmed ones on their website... I'm curious and i'd like to try them.
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Old 9th February 2011, 04:37 PM   #19
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Having said that, some also said that the tantalums sound too “nice”, with less control in bass and a touch less “presence” in the midrange.
Hmmm, interesting.

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Old 10th February 2011, 04:13 AM   #20
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Objectively, bulk metal foils and probably low Tc wirewounds are probably the best resistors of all; they are rather expensive too. Especially Vishay's Z-foil resistors, which have an extremely low Tc (< 1ppm) and voltage coefficient. Tantalum resistors that I've seen don't have any specification for those parameters at all; carbon films are mostly way, way out to the other end of the range, which may account for their more colored sound.

Can't go wrong with Caddocks, either. I'd go with any 25 ppm metal film type you can find, if price is a consideration.
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