Glass bead rectifiers - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Parts

Parts Where to get, and how to make the best bits. PCB's, caps, transformers, etc.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 25th January 2011, 11:02 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
john dozier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: columbia sc
Default Glass bead rectifiers

Anyone used them? How is their quality.? the only manufacture I can find on the web says they are fast response. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th January 2011, 02:42 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Auburn, WA (somewhere between Seattle and Tacoma)
Blog Entries: 1
Send a message via ICQ to Damon Hill
Got any specific part numbers in mind? Soft recovery types are preferred.
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th January 2011, 10:59 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
john dozier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: columbia sc
These are in a Chinese made DAC. Part number is BY56MV, This number produces nothing on Google. Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th January 2011, 12:08 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
john dozier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: columbia sc
I have some Fairchild "stealth" diodes I can use,but the board the glass diodes are mounted on is small it would be a real PITA. I would like to leave them if possible.Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th January 2011, 12:34 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Canandaigua, NY USA
There's a whole series of BY diodes, some of which are ultra fast, not soft by any means. I think mine are Philips. I didn't have any luck with a quick search, but may be able to find you some data later. No idea about the quality of Chinese-made versions.

CH
__________________
I may be barking up the wrong tree, but at least I'm barking!
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th January 2011, 02:17 AM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Canandaigua, NY USA
Searched through my data and didn't find anything for a two letter prefix. Now if it were a three letter prefix like BYM, that might produce more results. I don't know how ambitious you are, but it is possible to test diodes and rectifiers for speed and recovery. I think the circuits are sometimes published by the diode makers, or at least the test conditions are given.

Conrad
__________________
I may be barking up the wrong tree, but at least I'm barking!
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th January 2011, 05:24 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
jneutron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: away
Quote:
Originally Posted by john dozier View Post
Anyone used them?
Yes. As well as involvement in a manufacturing line for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by john dozier View Post
How is their quality.?
That depends on the manufacturer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by john dozier View Post
the only manufacture I can find on the web says they are fast response.
They can be anything from 2 microseconds to 2 nanoseconds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by john dozier View Post
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
Sure. Do you have any particular question?

In general:
1. The axial lead glass bead is a method of passivating the junction to prevent ionic contamination from destroying the diode. It is applied as a slurry to the device, and it is fired. It bonds to the moly or tungston slugs that sandwich the die. The leads are typically nailhead coppers that are brazed to the slugs.
2. Some diodes such as the '914, are glass sleeves slipped over the brazed assembly and fired, it shrinks and seals to the slugs.
3. Super-rectifiers, such as General Instrument (their patent expired in the late 80's), had a glass bead that was overmolded with plastic to facilitate auto-insertion.

In the early days, the glass bead was a symbol of high reliability. As the molding plastics and protection compounds improved, non-glass devices became more and more reliable.

Cheers, John
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th January 2011, 05:31 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
john dozier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: columbia sc
Thanks for the information. The part number on them is BY56MV. I would like to know if replacing them with Fairchild "stealth" diodes would improve the sq in a Chinese made DAC. Replacement would be a real PITA due to the size of the circuit board and I would rather not have to do it. If it would SIGNIFICANTLY improve the sq, then I will do the fiddly bits. Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th January 2011, 06:00 PM   #9
tomchr is offline tomchr  United States
diyAudio Member
 
tomchr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Hard to tell without having a schematic or knowing what function the diodes perform.

~Tom
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th January 2011, 06:09 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
john dozier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: columbia sc
They are all in the power supply forming bridges for rectification of incoming AC. Regards and thanks
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
glass passivated plastic rectifiers chopchip Solid State 1 20th April 2010 02:27 PM
Schematic symbol for ferrite bead? peranders Software Tools 5 24th February 2010 03:53 AM
Ferrite bead help Simpleton Parts 1 29th June 2005 01:16 PM
Ferrite Bead Question mixmonster Parts 1 11th April 2005 03:31 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:24 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2