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-   -   2N2222A transistor and transisitor history (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/parts/158490-2n2222a-transistor-transisitor-history.html)

ncdrawl 10th January 2010 05:59 PM

2N2222A transistor and transisitor history
 
:cop:Posts moved from: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/tubes...ge-design.html

__________________________________________________ _____


Quote:

Originally Posted by Ivey (Post 2042369)
snip

Hey Sir, I sent you a pm.

please email me at luxaeternaaudio@gmail.com

Original Burnedfingers 10th January 2010 07:11 PM

Quote:

My the phone preamp used three 2N2222A. It is very, very quite.

You may being thinking, I am crazy. Yet allow me to lay some facts on you.

a. the max. noise level of a 2N2222A, is 4db. No more
b. its dc current gain is 50 to infinite, at 10na/10volts
c. its dc current gain is 75 to 325, at 1.ma/10volts. Which is much better than some of the more new transistor designs for high gain. Believe me, any thing above 375 in gain, is only better noise level. Not a better transistor. And its real Vceo is 50 volts, not 40 volts.

Once it is built, you will never want for another preamp. Because you will never lose that smooth warm tones of a 2N2222A. Will not believe your ears.

Quote: You may be thinking, I am crazy. Not a better transistor.
Yup, I think you are crazy all right.

Miles Prower 10th January 2010 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ivey (Post 2042369)
There is only one great phono preamp. And I designed and built it for the US Government in 1961. And it uses only three transistors. A transistor that was designed in 1956. That is still made today, for as low as 3 cent each per 100.

My the phone preamp used three 2N2222A. It is very, very quite.

These guys say different. I highly doubt that 2N2222's were from 1956. Back in those days, transistors were almost always PNP types made from germanium. The 2N2222 is a silicon, NPN type. If it was introduced in 1962, you couldn't have built anything with them in 1961.

Did you disremember the date or device used here?

TheGimp 10th January 2010 11:55 PM

I've got some Germanium 2N321s. Datecode is 8450.

Audio Output transistors no less.

Ivey 11th January 2010 05:43 AM

Mister Gimp
 
I could use those Ge. transistors.

This is not a joke. I can use them for constructing Fuzz Boxes, Wah Wahs, and Reverb Driver amps for my grandson and his band.

One friend of mine offered to give me his 2N404's, but he checked, he had already toss them. But if you truly do not need or desire them. I would be happy to take them off your hands.

Take Care

Ivey

Ivey 11th January 2010 06:21 AM

Miles:
 
I am not a person that throws mess on a wall, to see if it sticks.

Development of silicon transistors started in 1952. They did not appear on the open market for use in electronic equipment maker until 1959.

America had jet planes in 1944, they did not show up until 1948.

Companies invested heavy in Ge. techology. They needed to make their investment back. But world events forced Amercia to push it electronic techology forward, sooner that it wanted to.

First Nuclear Missile Submarines
Second. The Russians launched the first satellite.

If you would just think back to the early sixes, you will remember Transistor Radios were sold by how many silicon transistors it had, not Ge.
transistors.

North American needed to upgrade the F-100 from C to D model. The new radar system transmitter could not put out the energy needed for the system range of 8 to 10 miles. The reciever unit used Ge. We used the new silicon TO-59 transistors in the transmitter. 1959-60

The 2N2222A was designed 1956. It came out for production use in 1959. When the cost came down to $9.47 each. Companies felt it was worth the risk to use the new TO-18.

NASA pushed for the release of the all silicon development in 1964. Because the Ge. could not handle the rigger of space travel.

Do you remember the TO-18/2N2484, it came out in 1967. One of its first commercial users was Standel Amplifiers in California. They used it for the Gibson Solid State Amps in the early 1970's. And do not forget Fender in 1964 to 1968, UNivox, Westbury, and on and on.

So, lets find some peace. You do not doubt me. And I will never doubt you.

Take Care

Ivey

barretter 11th January 2010 11:18 AM

But there is every reason to doubt you. The 2N2222A was designed by a team headed by Jack Haenichen at Motorola in the early 1960s. He joined Motorola in 1959 and at that time Motorola had not produced a single transistor using silicon : they were all germanium. Motorola introduced the 2N2222A at the 1962 IRE conference. Just check out the semiconductor museum website.
I would also be intrigued to know why the US government wanted a phono stage. I can see their need for jet planes, but not special super-duper phono stages.

leadbelly 11th January 2010 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by barretter (Post 2043202)
I would also be intrigued to know why the US government wanted a phono stage. I can see their need for jet planes, but not special super-duper phono stages.

You need to watch Top Gun again. Tunes are quite necessary for proper jet fighter operation. :)

barretter 11th January 2010 04:57 PM

This Top Gun appears to be a North American audio-visual entertainment starring a midget but I can't say I've ever seen it. I presume they used very high compliance cartridges on the cockpit turntable.

Arnulf 11th January 2010 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ivey (Post 2043020)
America had jet planes in 1944, they did not show up until 1948.

Sure they did. It would have been pretty embarassing to only be able to introduce a mediocre counterpart to existing examples almost 5 years later (in 1948) than other countries developed theirs (1942-44), had your statement been true.


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