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-   -   How to separate E from I in transformer? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/parts/11876-how-separate-e-i-transformer.html)

mad_z 2nd March 2003 09:41 PM

How to separate E from I in transformer?
 
I have 2 trannies in which I need to separate E from I - they are crossed on each layer and glued together - is there any way to melt the glue???

The layers are like this:
E I
I E
E I

and so on....

Thanks for any hints!!

Sch3mat1c 3rd March 2003 12:52 AM

Well, you *could* always bring it up to 800F, that's sure to char everything inside the transformer... ;)
Including the enamel on the wire, leaving it useless. :(
(But if you don't give a damn about it - or the smell! :bigeyes:, then I think this would actually work.)

Laminations are usually seperated very tediously with a knife and bit of persuasion (small hammer to break the lam. off its varnish).

Tim

Circlotron 3rd March 2003 12:57 AM

I have heard that maybe xylene or toluene might work ok. Don't know anything about it though. Could be poisonous!!

Circlotron 3rd March 2003 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Sch3mat1c
Well, you *could* always bring it up to 800F, that's sure to char everything inside the transformer... ;)
You don't want to burn the insulating coating off the laminations otherwise they will behave as one big metal block instead of separate slices, and the eddy current losses will be enormous. Very hot very quick. :eek:

Circlotron 3rd March 2003 04:56 AM

Correction...
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Circlotron
I have heard that maybe xylene or toluene might work ok. Don't know anything about it though. Could be poisonous!!
Whoops! I meant to say trichloroethylene.

Sch3mat1c 3rd March 2003 05:13 AM

Hey, I've got a gallon of that (1,1,1 TCE) in the basement! ;)

I heard the insulation is the scale (iron oxide) on the lams...I know the varnish does something but doesn't the oxide too?

Tim

psychokids 3rd March 2003 05:14 AM

hello,

im assuming its just an average, varnish impregnated power transformer type of thing. basically, what i have found to work best is to take a file, and to square off all the edges of a slotted screwdriver, to make it pretty much as good and sharp as a new one. take a razor blade and go around the edges of the top lamination on either side of the transformer (go for the one that seems easiest to get at). try to break the lamination off as much as possible. next, put the transformer so the bottom of the lamination is hanging off the edge of a desk, and use the screwdriver and a hammer to tap out the first lamination. this process is pretty tough to put in writing, but basically you are getting the first one out at all costs, because once its out, the other ones come out with no problem. dont worry about messing it up, because usually it is very difficult or impossible to get them all back in anyways. i usually have a few left over and it doenst harm much. good luck.

-chris

SkinnyBoy 3rd March 2003 05:29 AM

Yes, what TYPE of transformer core are we talking about? I am thinking of the cores in those that come from computer powersupplies.. Sometimes chucking them in the oven for a while works... sometimes not, depends on the trpy of glue..

mad_z 3rd March 2003 06:41 AM

Thanks for replies!!

It's standard EI power supply transformer made of laminated metal sheets - I think I will try do as proposed: using knife, screwdriver and hammer remove first lamination and then if it's easier to remove the rest as gently as possible - I'm looking for that kind of lamination in the shops for substitute. I tried yesterday removing the first lamination and the are very stiff and I found it very difficult to separate them....

Thanks again!
Greets,

Circlotron 3rd March 2003 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Sch3mat1c
I heard the insulation is the scale (iron oxide) on the lams...I know the varnish does something but doesn't the oxide too?

It would be primarily the oxide because the tranny will work without any varnish. I heard once that when an electric motor has really had the gizzard burnt out of it, it affects this oxide stuff and when rewound is not quite as good as it used to be. Mild burnouts are ok though.


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