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Old 5th December 2012, 07:44 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turbodawg View Post
I used roofing mastic on a birch ply sub box a while back, worked well. Took a while to dry and stop smelling.
Given that I am stretching the range of these boxes into the mid-bass, I will try the roofing stuff, and maybe try a little Pink as one will definitely be easier to remove than the other
Phil
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Old 5th December 2012, 08:07 PM   #12
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Stay off "pink" - unless you like wearing a mask and gloves while using it or fixing the gear. Don't stuff the box if you want the port to do what it is spec'd to do with your simulation. At anything above 100Hz or so, I'd want substantial absorption on the walls to absorb as much internal reflected energy as possible, if you want maximum sonic wonderfulness.

There are a variety of materials that are low cost and are nicely absorptive at the frequencies of interest, and they don't make you itch or mess with your lungs...

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Old 5th December 2012, 08:50 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bear View Post
Stay off "pink" - unless you like wearing a mask and gloves while using it or fixing the gear. Don't stuff the box if you want the port to do what it is spec'd to do with your simulation. At anything above 100Hz or so, I'd want substantial absorption on the walls to absorb as much internal reflected energy as possible, if you want maximum sonic wonderfulness.

There are a variety of materials that are low cost and are nicely absorptive at the frequencies of interest, and they don't make you itch or mess with your lungs...

_-_-bear

I did some reading on this, regular fiberglass is definitely a bad idea in a ported speaker....lol.
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Old 6th December 2012, 01:02 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bear View Post
Stay off "pink" - unless you like wearing a mask and gloves while using it or fixing the gear. Don't stuff the box if you want the port to do what it is spec'd to do with your simulation. At anything above 100Hz or so, I'd want substantial absorption on the walls to absorb as much internal reflected energy as possible, if you want maximum sonic wonderfulness.

There are a variety of materials that are low cost and are nicely absorptive at the frequencies of interest, and they don't make you itch or mess with your lungs...
I was going to go with a coating of the roofing tar at least. But I would like to take these 2x15s fairly high into the midrange. They aren't serious subs and were never meant to be, and from the various different threads I've started it seems that opinion is that I can take them as high as I care to, except that more and more mid frequencies will start coming out of the ports, and not in a good way. Of course, I have used commercial full-range 2x15s that go all the way up until a horn kicks in around 3K, and I haven't necessarily heard nasty stuff coming out of their ports.

You can weigh in with at what frequency the ports become problematic if you care to. But let's just say 500Hz... and even that is arbitrary. What sort of materials would be better than reg'lar Pink at the higher frequencies please? Don't include Dynamat or Acoustastuf (it's to expensive).
I don't really have a problem handling Pink (or yellow) if that works.
Thanks
Phil
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Old 6th December 2012, 01:36 AM   #15
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consider any matted material that is not hard.

a cocoa fiber door mat would actually be good at mid and high freqs... but they shed and are not so cheap.

now you have a clue or two... commonly available materials are quite available and suitable, IF you know how to use them...

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Old 6th December 2012, 02:07 AM   #16
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Default Roofing compound for sound absorption

Quote:
Originally Posted by turbodawg View Post
I used roofing mastic on a birch ply sub box a while back, worked well. Took a while to dry and stop smelling.
Something like this maybe (this one is rubber based, not plastic): 0.90 Gal. 208R Rubber Wet Patch Roof Cement-HE208R142 at The Home Depot

Brush or spackling trowel please?
Thanks
Phil
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Old 6th December 2012, 02:10 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bear View Post
consider any matted material that is not hard.
Matted materials that are not hard.
Matted materials that are not hard.
Matted materials that are not hard.

I appear not to have any imagination...other than another type of doormat not made of coconut fibers of course.
More clues please

Thanks
Phil
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Old 6th December 2012, 04:39 AM   #18
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Mattress foam, that egg crate type. I have tacked a piece of fabric over polyfill on the back of some home speakers in the past.
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Old 6th December 2012, 12:40 PM   #19
Xoc1 is offline Xoc1  United Kingdom
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Since giving up on using pink fibreglass insulation on the grounds that it is bad for peoples health, and also can damage a speaker voice coil as the glass fibre is abrasive. I now use polyester fibre as used inside bedding duvets. This is maybe not quite as effective but certainly dampens out upper frequency resonances.
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Old 6th December 2012, 01:33 PM   #20
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I just picked up some Poly-fil nu-foam, which seems like a cross between scotchbrite and semi-rigid fiberglass. New thread on the subject:

Poly-fil NU-FOAM for speaker stuffing/lining?
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