Why is a pro woofer bad for home use? - Page 10 - diyAudio
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Old 5th February 2013, 02:10 PM   #91
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To answer the OP's question: Because your spouse might probably not like it !!!

Regards

Charles
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Old 10th February 2013, 05:39 AM   #92
JackNZ is offline JackNZ  New Zealand
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I wonder who is determining the difference between pro speakers and home speakers here . You guys seem to agree that a speaker with a rubber sorround is a HiFi one and a thing like those Dayton 12" should be pro audio or P.A. As a working sound engineer and sound system designer I must tell you that to build the best possible sound reinforcing system you pick the best possible drivers that the market can give you. You look for the parameters you need. That can be a very high excursion if you want to build a subwoofer, together with a high power capability. You have to calculate a enclosure for the speaker you pick and then putting in a driver with totally different parameters will just not work. In the pro sektor there are many diferrent speakers, each build for a specific task. What determines a really pro transducer (not a Dayton, no one in the pro sektor uses them) is first its long time stability and reliability. The drivers out of the box should show verymuch the same parameters so your product once designed can be manufactured and the units all sound the same. This will of course happen only if you are using premium components, be it a small woofer with a foam surround or be it a 21" driver designed to take 1000 Watts. There is pro sound systems using 5" drivers which very much look like a usual woofer out of a white van box, but only from the outside. If a pro (really pro) sound system is designed to cover the full audio spectrum at low distortion, you can use it in your home and will enjoy a perfect sound. If you go and get you'r 30 years old Peavey 2 Way speakers from the basement, you won't.
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Old 10th February 2013, 06:46 AM   #93
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Quote:
I wonder who is determining the difference between pro speakers and home speakers here
Maybe it's the home itself
that has boundaries, which are reflective...
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Old 10th February 2013, 09:15 AM   #94
JackNZ is offline JackNZ  New Zealand
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A home will reflect any source of sound. If it is a home speaker or a 'professional' one. So I am not shure what the real nature of your post was.
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Old 10th February 2013, 09:38 AM   #95
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I took for granted Spiderman's assumption that 'the more the power you have, the more responsibilities you have to face'.
Indeed we are not talking about power or sound throwing or coverage that
are of no interest when playing some records at home.
We should inspect the ability of recreating an illusion , which is the soundfield
of the original record, transponded in time and place. Then we should stimulate our judgement abilities to establish if the goal is reached.
I'm in the position of agreeing with the ones that have expressed the fact that searching a good reproduction by using pro drivers is very hard.
I only own a pair of Audax PR17Mo that I bought to pair them with some
15" that I had; I also bought a pair of compression tweeters ( B&C DE7) but I much prefer the sound of my Audax TW025A16. Not to mention that the
system still deserves a subwoofer.
So what? I haven't responded to the question about boundaries and reflections...
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Old 10th February 2013, 09:55 AM   #96
JackNZ is offline JackNZ  New Zealand
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The coverage is very important on a speaker system in a room.
When your speaker has a flat frequencie response on main axys but has not a even coverage through the frequency band that means that the reflected part of the sound will not be flat. Reflection is a great part of what we hear in a room. Therefore it is desirable that the coverage of a speaker is as even as possible through the audible frequency band.
If you are going to pair a 15" driver with a tweeter or a compression driver
this is hard to achieve because the 15" will start to nnarrow its coverage dramatically above of 800 Hz.
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Old 10th February 2013, 09:58 AM   #97
JMFahey is offline JMFahey  Argentina
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Quote:
I wonder who is determining the difference between pro speakers and home speakers here .
Who? Don't know.
But a main difference is *where* they are meant to be used.

A Pro speaker needs to cover *huge* space with high SPL, so will have both high sensitivity (97 to 103 dB/W) , with somewhat less acceptable, if a subwoofer.
Will also have as high directivity as possible and handle from 250W up ... *real* RMS watts, all night long.
Less than perfect frequency response may be accepted, considering many (most?) times they will be used in horrible sounding places anyway (Madison Square Garden, Stadiums, School Gyms, etc.), because high SPL takes precedence.

A Home speaker will be used in ... a home , so much lower sensitivity is still acceptable, down to 84/86 dB/W
You are enjoying music at home, want wide range, low distortion, can sacrifice sensitivity.

You can not do PA work with home speakers, period.
You can use a Pro system at home, it will be "harsh" many times.
There are flat and sweet Pro systems, but they are *very* expensive, because they still have to meet sensitivity and high SPL specs.

Car speakers? : meet none of the above constraints: neither flat (that's an understatement) nor efficient (this is also an understatement).
Oh well.
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Old 10th February 2013, 10:01 AM   #98
JackNZ is offline JackNZ  New Zealand
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O.K., i missed out the fact that you have a midrange speaker.
Then you can build a three way system and have a reasonable coverage.
The B&C DE7 must be paired to a horn and needs a special equalisation.
Still it is a compression driver and has because of its working principle more distortion than a soft dome tweeter.
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Old 10th February 2013, 10:11 AM   #99
JackNZ is offline JackNZ  New Zealand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMFahey View Post


You can not do PA work with home speakers, period.
You can use a Pro system at home, it will be "harsh" many times.
There are flat and sweet Pro systems, but they are *very* expensive, because they still have to meet sensitivity and high SPL specs.

.

By now we were talking about the drivers, not the system itself.
I don't agree that a "pro" speaker chassis is louder but sounds "harsh" or can not make deep bass frequencys. There are very good speakkers for professional use that sound good, can reach very low frequencys and have low distortions. And yes, there cost some monney. It is a precision engineering, good materials and experience from people who know what they're doing. No woodoo.
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Old 11th February 2013, 10:52 AM   #100
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Most hifi woofers are designed to go low in resonably small boxes. This is done at the cost of efficiency. They have quite low distortion at the intended application.

PA woofers have good efficiency in reasonably sized (regarding the application) boxes at the cost of low-end extension. They offer quite low distortion at high SPL levels and the offer very low distortion at low SPL levels. Many PA woofers beat a lot of HiFi ones in this respect.
If you want to get low bass form a PA woofer then the bax has to be large and special tunings are needed and you will also suffer from a loss of efficiency.
But the result can be very good - you will just not be able to use a tiny little box.

Regards

Chalres
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