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Old 7th January 2012, 01:32 PM   #1
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Lightbulb What happened to music after THE INTERNET!

I was checking the thread 'What happened to music after 1992?' and decided to make another more comteporary thread for a couple reasons:

1992 was 20 (20!!!) years ago and times have changed and music, as an art, as a product, as a communication device, it's technology to produce and reproduce, etc have also changed dramatically... From the LP to the MP3, from the record store to iTunes, from the big record labels to the indy people...

First, very quick music after 1992: It became a business. Artists gave up soul for dollar signs. Their stuff went into scrutiny by big record corporations (examples of such corporation, the RIAA) because corporations wanted artists to create music that was sure to sell, thus, artists becoming mainstream, becoming sellouts.

It happened a lot within my type of music, Punk Rock, when the most evil corporation that kills music, MTV, wanted a piece of the pie as well changing a lot of my favorite bands back then into commertial products. It also influenced other artists into thinking going commertial = getting a contract with big music corporatios thus allowing them to make money.

Now, 1992 was a very long time ago. What happened to music after 2005 +/-?

The internet came and with it a whole different ball game. Technologies became more efficient, cheap and easy to aquire. Communication became quicker and more effective, artists from New York could collaborate with artists in California without taking a single plane, bus or train (check out band: The Postal Service).

Creating recording studios is cheaper than ever. Powerful computer software like Logic and Reason is more easy to get and powerful than ever. Even to promote your music, Facebook, MySpace,Twitter is way better and cheaper then say any corporate music magazine like Rolling Stone.

Even the not-cool aspects like 'music sharing' promote bands getting their live presentations full of people. An interview I saw on TV with rapper Pitbull, he said artists dont make money like they used to on record sales, they have to tour and sell merch, do ads, collaborations etc if they want to make money, people with a smartphone is a potential music sharer thus promoter.

Now artists can do everything themselves, from production to event management by themselves leaving completely out of the equation the big music corporations. Their content comes out like they want when they want without deadlines leading to rushed productions etc. From those who were under a music contract while the internet boom, are not comming back and becoming independent. Websites like pitchfork, pandora, last.fm, amazon, itunes can recommend similar artists.

So what has changed? Everything changed. This on a audiophile forum is interesting because a debate can come out like 'that indy music doesnt have quality' or 'the production techniques are inferior of those corporations with money' but definetly more creativity exists and easier to aquire than ever. Sure we dont longer have the Marvin Gayes, Gloria Gaynors, Pink Floyds, The Doors, John Coltrane etc but we have The Cinematic Orquestra, Adele, Florence + The Machine, Jaga Jazzist, Bonobo....

What do you think? Older people, how you feel about music after the internet? Even vinyl sales have gotten up in later years due more artists keeping the format alive...
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Old 7th January 2012, 01:41 PM   #2
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quenepas View Post
First, very quick music after 1992: It became a business. Artists gave up soul for dollar signs.
What? You're not serious, I hope. I was working in the music business in 1992 and don't remember any great shift. Believe me, it was a business long before that and continues to be one today.
The biggest shift I see from the '90s is that back then concerts supported CD sales. The money was in record sales. Now the money is in concerts. That's not such a bad change, is it?
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Old 7th January 2012, 02:05 PM   #3
SY is offline SY  United States
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What Pano said- for 45 years, I've been actively going to concerts, buying records, and (many years ago) playing in bands, and it's ALWAYS been about the money. As I've said ad nauseum, the Internet has only been a good thing, greatly increasing diversity and removing the gatekeepers with suits and focus groups. The oddball-talented local indy bands (like Crack the Sky, Okkervil River, Dark Dark Dark) can suddenly find audiences outside of their home turf- and be accessible to them.
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Old 7th January 2012, 03:30 PM   #4
jlsem is offline jlsem  United States
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I had a conversation with Bob Shane of the Kingston Trio about ten years ago and he said to me, "John, when we first got into this business it was for the women. Then we were doing it for the fame. Now we just do it for the money."

John
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Old 7th January 2012, 05:07 PM   #5
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It has certainly been a money business back to the wax roll and Edison, through the big bands and Sinatra, soul, rock n' roll, pop of all varieties, punk, headbanger, to today. The record companies ruled as gods by pushing coke up the noses of DJs many decades ago. All through the lure for many performers was sex, drugs, money & fame in some order. The internet has only changed that by creating a huge bypass path around the moneymen at the center. Its done good in diversity, bad in lack of uniform quality (although the money men sin here as well), awful where it has expropriated the property of performers without fair compensation, and great for removing the bottlenecks.
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Old 7th January 2012, 05:52 PM   #6
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Internet makes some hard to find music recordings easier accessible that is a real pro.
Also the fact that Atlantic City organ that was started in 1929 eventually was accomplished almost a Century later in XXI makes me feel there is some interest in music now as well. Lovely instrument BTW http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBFtgzmxunY

Very few primarily HiEnd stereos are able to reproduce recordings with adequate quality at home however.
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Old 7th January 2012, 06:43 PM   #7
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It's somewhat similar to a conversation I had with my 15 YO niece, I told her her hand-held device will in a decade or so, give her access to any and all music/narration/movies EVER recorded. The entire sum of human Knowledge ever recorded, available in her hand. She didn't understand any of the ramifications this would imply......but it is coming. It would seem quantity vs. quality are inversely proportional. The by now, infamous statement of the Mixing Engineer pandering to the "customer"....the poor mixing, we will soon see the drop in quality of video to match the "customers" 150mm screen size. Bandwidth will not be able to keep up with the incoming flood of volume. Handheld media will fall onto the "elites" of music & video.........us.
With our 'passion' we will be the odd-balls of society, not caving into the "norm".......That's OK, we never really were!

__________________________________________________ _____Rick........

Last edited by Richard Ellis; 7th January 2012 at 06:43 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 7th January 2012, 08:40 PM   #8
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlsem View Post
"John, when we first got into this business it was for the women."
The all time, number one motivation in the music biz.

There was a great Life In Hell comic to this effect about 20 years ago.
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Old 7th January 2012, 10:13 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
What? You're not serious, I hope. I was working in the music business in 1992 and don't remember any great shift. Believe me, it was a business long before that and continues to be one today.
The biggest shift I see from the '90s is that back then concerts supported CD sales. The money was in record sales. Now the money is in concerts. That's not such a bad change, is it?
Yes you have a point and to put it more specific, it has always been a business dominated by big music corporations like BME, Sony, Universal, etc and like any business they want to sell. Good or bad what matters was the sale.

Now change came within 2005 with the advent of the internet. More people with high speed connections became better quality and better technologies to distribute music. Artists could leave corporations out of the equation and produce, promote and tour their music the way they see fit. No deadlines, no corporate filters.

After Korn made the first album, Blind, they got a record label who demanded another record within a deadline. They say the reason the second album, A.D.I.D.A.S, was such rubberish is because of a deadline. This also reminds me of lazy artists that make an album with 2-3 good songs and the rest is filler. Now you can get the song you want for ~$2.

Let's take another example, it may be controversial but many important businesses analysts and publications say it, Steve Jobs changes the way we interact with music with the iPod and the way we acquire it, iTunes. Around where I live, record stores with many years in the market like "Casa de los Tapes", "La gran Discoteca" Disco Hits" among others all have been closing in droves for the last 10 years since people are no longer going there to get their music. Same thing is happening with Blockbuster in the movies department. The Blockbusters became Netflix and the record stores iTunes, SoundCloud, MixCloud etc. People get online and from the comfort of their home they get it.

Now I think that's quite a big change.

The vinyl LP album format still being produced for audio aficionados in mind. Not tape, not 8-track but vinyl with better sound quality. Big artists like Radiohead sell their music online and many times even give it for free. They know the money is on concerts and the hassle of producing physical copies, distribution, retail handshake is just not worth it due people pirating it in the first place.

Beign a DJ myself, our industry has changed more in the last 5 years than since it's most primitive inception. I no longer need to buy vinyl, I use a DVS (digital vinyl system) and get my music on Beatport on the format I see fit, AIFF, WAV, 320kbps MP3, FLAC etc. Instead of buying an album for $20 I buy the track I see fit for $2. Just like iTunes.
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Old 7th January 2012, 10:40 PM   #10
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Shure, we now have new an often very talented artists and groups.
However one essential part seems to be missing for the most part........ good songs with a real mellody and interesting chord pattern.
Now, it seems we often just have a boaring, predictable beat with a monotone vocal drone over a single chord that subs for a melody!
I suspect that it's mainly due to giving the "people" what they want instead of being creative.

Last edited by JoeDJ; 7th January 2012 at 10:43 PM.
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